The electric carmaker’s update after a series of car fires has also cut into how far vehicles go without a recharge and lengthened charging time, complaints and lawsuit say. Guillermo Perez says he’s not a stereotypical Tesla owner. He isn’t an uber-rich guy who drives a quirky, high-tech car to impress his friends. He’s a Chicago firefighter. And he says he worked hard to be able to buy his 2014 Tesla model S85, which cost just under $100,000 but, he figures, at least uses zero gas, so he would save there. “I was pro-Tesla,” says Perez, who loved the idea of driving an American-made product that’s also environmentally friendly. “I literally threw my life savings into it.” So he was pretty unhappy when a software update that the company pushed out in May to address a potential fire risk in some Tesla models ended up also cutting into how far he could drive without needing to recharge the battery pack and making the recharging process take longer. After the May 15 update, Perez says the maximum range on his electric car suddenly fell from 255 miles to as few as 221 miles — a drop equivalent to the driving distance from downtown Chicago to Naperville. “They said everything was fi...