Tom Brown with the prototype ultrasound (top left) and (bottom right) showing classmates his inventions during training at Allan Glen’s school, which prepared pupils undergraduate study in sciences. Mr Brown in retirement (top right) THE daughters of one of Scotland’s ultrasound pioneers have spoken of their hope that his unfinished work to end crippling injuries among sonographers will finally be realised after his death. Thomas Brown, the visionary young electrical engineer who famously blagged his way into the landmark project, died aged 86 on December 13. Before falling ill with pneumonia in 2014, he devoted his retirement to researching how to redesign ultrasound technology to cut the high rates of repetitive strain injury plaguing sonographers worldwide. Research has indicated that as many as 80-90 per cent of sonographers develop musculoskeletal disorders caused by the way they have to stand and move their joints during scanning. As a result, the profession has a high incidence of sickness absence and early retirement due to injury. The father-of-three became aware of the problem in 2006 when his youngest daughter, Rhona, developed a serious complication call...