A good Wednesday to all. As summer counts down its final days, its another hot and humid day for the Quad-Cities. Here are the weather details from the National Weather Service.

Look for patchy fog before 9 a.m. Otherwise the will be mostly sunny and humid with a high near 85 degrees. Peak heat indices are expected to reach the low 90s along and south of a line from Independence, Iowa to the Quad-Cities to Galva, Illinois. A few locations could reach the mid-90s for afternoon heat indices in the counties south of Interstate 80.

Thunderstorms are possible tonight for some areas of the Q-C region with the primary threat being heavy rain and lightning. Skies will be mostly clear in the Quad-Cities with a low around 66 degrees and a 20% chance of precipitation.



Thursday will see a 40% chance of showers and thunderstorms before 1 p.m. Skies will be mostly cloudy with a high near 84 degrees and a low around 68 degrees. There's a 20% chance of overnight showers and thunderstorms.

The Flood Warning for the Rock River at Moline continues until Thursday. Early today the river was at 13.41 feet and falling. Flood stage is 12 feet. The Rock is expected to fall below flood stage Thursday.

At 13.2 feet, water affects 60th Street south of John Deere Road in Moline and 75th Avenue from Green Valley Park 48th Street. Water is on Canal Road in Big Island.

Annette Cahill and defense attorney Clemens Erdahl discuss the trial Tuesday during closing arguments. The second murder trial of Cahill began last Monday with jury selection.

A Muscatine jury began deliberations Tuesday afternoon to determine whether Annette Cahill murdered Corey Wieneke in October 1992.

The state and the defense made closing arguments Tuesday in the second first-degree murder trial of Cahill. Wieneke, 22, was found dead from blunt force trauma injuries to the head Oct. 13, 1992, in his rural West Liberty home. Cahill, now 56, was arrested in May 2018 and charged with killing Wieneke, her former boyfriend. Read more.

EAST MOLINE — The cause of the August fire that destroyed two downtown buildings may never be determined.

A Scott County jury will decide whether Latrice Lacey was the aggressor or just defending herself and her friend when she swung a small sledge…

An autopsy on a West Chicago man whose body was found Sunday in the Mississippi River did not shed light on how he died. 

Just a friendly reminder... Help us help you! #LockItUp Do not leave your vehicle/house unlocked and unattended. pic.twitter.com/xyNDcWi1jM

Danielle Alvarez, I-74 project manager for the Iowa Department of Transportation, left, talks with Quad-City Times columnist Barb Ickes about the new I-74 bridge project Tuesday.

You wouldn't guess it from the ground, but the arch pieces being set for the new bridge have the interior space of semitrailers.

For the bridge-obsessed, the factoids that came out of a riverfront chat Tuesday with I-74 Project Manager Danielle Alvarez are satisfyingly mind blowing.

We knew from interviews with local iron workers that the arches are hollow inside. As sections are added, they are bolted together from the inside. An apparent shortage of imagination had Quad-City Times columnist Barb Ickes picturing bent-over workers entering the arches with their torque wrenches.

But the fact is, they could drive a vehicle inside the arches. They are 8 feet wide and 10 feet high. Read more.

Looking across the Mississippi River at the new construction leading to the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, from the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

Construction on the new I-74 road westbound looking toward the Lincoln Road bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

Passengers on the Celebration Belle get a close-up view of the construction of the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf and Moline side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf and Moline side of the Mississippi River.

A construction worker secures the base of a street light on a portion of the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

Workers are shown June 26 scaling the arch segments on the new I-74 bridge to access and connect the sections. Last week, a winch that was being used to pull the critically needed cable to the top of the tower suddenly gave out.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

Passengers on the Channel Cat get a close-up view of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, from the Mississippi River.

Construction workers take delivery of pieces needed to build the arches for the new Interstate 74 bridge. Parts and pieces are raised to the workers by crane, and ironworkers must enter the arches to connect each piece.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Bettendorf side of the Mississippi River.

The construction zone for the new Interstate 74 bridge is a maze of cranes, towers and cables. Workers have been trying in recent days to connect an important set of cables to the towers in the photo, which will hold the arch pieces in place.

Looking across the Mississippi River at the new construction leading away from the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, from the Moline side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, from the Moline side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Moline side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Moline side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Moline side of the Mississippi River.

Scenes of construction on the new I-74 bridge, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, on the Moline side of the Mississippi River.

James "Jim" Slavens, whose careers spanned the fields of law, banking and business, was remembered Tuesday as "the idea guy" and an early entrepreneur.    

"I don't know that there has ever been a more creative business mind that I ever met. Jim was always full of ideas, always on the cutting edge," said his nephew Joe Slavens, who succeeded him in leadership at Northwest Bank & Trust Co., Davenport. 

Jim Slavens of Bettendorf died Monday at Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House in Bettendorf. He was 77. Read more.

Moline's Kaeden Dreifurst looks down the field as he runs away from a tackler during the first quarter of their game at Moline last Friday. 

Brandon Barker from Clear Creek Amana High finishes first at the North Scott invitational cross country at Scott County Park, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019.

Bettendorf's Nick Moore finished in second place at the North Scott invitational cross country at Scott County Park, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019.

Pleasant Valley's Bella D'Antico races to the finish line Tuesday afternoon at the North Scott Invitational held at Scott County Park. D'Antico won the 5,000-meter race in 20 minutes, 5 seconds.

Pleasant Valley's Bella D'Antico won Tuesday's North Scott Invitational by 35 seconds at Scott County Park. It was the freshman's first win at the high school level.

Bettendorf's Nick Moore receives a hug from his mother, Lien Moore, after finishing second place at the North Scott Invitational cross country meet at Scott County Park on Tuesday.

Bettendorf's Samantha Foht finishes in second place in the girls race at the North Scott Invitational at Scott County Park on Tuesday.

Rock Island's Jordan Rice (2) fights for control of the ball with United Township's Miguel Rodriquez (20) at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

Rock Island goalkeeper Ben Samuelson (1) was good in all facets of the game on Tuesday in the Rocks' 3-0 victory over United Township at Public Schools Stadium. Here, the senior blocks a shot from United Township's Edgar Vega (5). Samuelson also scored a goal on a free kick from past midfield.

Rock Island's Nsengiyumva Landry (6) fights for control of the ball with United Township's Miguel Rodriquez (20) at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

Rock Island's Ben Samuelson (1) jumps around the stands with fans after scoring against United Township at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

United Township's Marcos Vasquez (8) gets control over Rock Island's Ceu Bik Lian (11) at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

United Township's Ben Downey (25) and Rock Island's Jordan Rice (2) attempt to gain possession of a loose ball during Tuesday's Western Big 6 Conference match at Rock Island's Almquist Field.

Rock Island's Edwin Beltran (19) fights for control of the ball with United Township's Marcos Rojas (8) at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

Rock Island's Jordan Rice (2) celebrates with teammates after scoring against United Township at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

Rock Island and United Township battle it out at at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island. Final Score at Rock Island: Rock Island 3, United Township 0.

Rock Island and United Township battle it out at at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island. Final Score at Rock Island: Rock Island 3, United Township 0.

Rock Island and United Township battle it out at at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island. Final Score at Rock Island: Rock Island 3, United Township 0.

United Township's Miguel Rodriquez (20) fights for control of the ball with Rock Island's Isaac Almanza (7) at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island.

Rock Island and United Township battle it out at at Almquist Field, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Rock Island. Final Score at Rock Island: Rock Island 3, United Township 0.

Five new light standards on the south side of 12th Street between Brady and Main streets are adding an extra feeling of security to the Hilltop Campus Village.

Five new decorative and functional LED light standards have been installed on the south side of Davenport's 12th Street between Brady and Main streets to enhance the safety and security of the people living there and people attending an increasing number of evening events. Read more.

View the University of Iowa 2019 football schedule, with players to watch and Big 10 stat comparison. Test your Hawkeyes knowledge with the jersey number quiz!

Cokie Roberts a longtime political reporter and analyst at ABC News and NPR, has died from complications from breast cancer.

FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2002, file photo, actress Shelley Morrison arrives to the NBC's television series "Will & Grace," 100th episode celebration at the Falcon restaurant in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles. Morrison, an actress with a 50-year career who was best known for playing a memorable maid on “Will and Grace,” has died. Publicist Lori DeWaal says Morrison died Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles from heart failure. She was 83. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Shelley Morrison, an actress with a 50-year career who was best known for playing a memorable maid on "Will & Grace," died Sunday, her publicist said.

Morrison died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles from heart failure after a brief illness, publicist Lori DeWaal told The Associated Press. She was 83.

Morrison played Rosario Salazar, a maid from El Salvador, in the original run of "Will & Grace" from 1999 to 2006, becoming part of a cast that won a Screen Actors Guild award for best ensemble in a comedy series.

The character, originally written for a single episode, proved so popular in her interactions with co-star Megan Mullally that she would appear in 68 episodes during the NBC series' eight seasons.

"Rosario is one of my all-time favorite characters," Morrison said recently, according to a statement and biography announcing her death. "She reminds me a lot of my own mother, who loved animals and children, but she would not suffer fools. It is very significant to me that we were able to show an older, Hispanic woman who is bright and smart and can hold her own."

"My heart is heavy. putting shelley, her beloved husband walter & their children in the light. thank you for your friendship & partnership, shell. you accomplished wonderful things in this world. you will be missed," she tweeted.

Eric McCormack, who starred as Will in the NBC sitcom, recalled Morrison on Twitter as a "beautiful soul" and wonderful actor. "Her work as Rosario, season after season, was as nuanced and real as it was hysterical," McCormack tweeted.

Debra Messing, who starred as Grace in the sitcom, tweeted: "Oh, Shelley... what a loss. Our dear Rosario has passed on. Shelley had a career that spanned decades, but she will always be our dear Rosie. All my love to Walter and the entire family."

Sean Hayes, who played Jack McFarland on the sitcom, wrote in an Instagram post that Morrison "was absolutely hilarious and had the biggest heart."

Besides the opportunity to portray a strong Latina, Morrison valued "Will & Grace" for its breakthrough TV depiction of gay characters, said her husband, Walter Dominguez.

"Shelley's greatest pride as an actress was in playing the indomitable Rosario, in a comedy series that furthered the cause of social equity and fairness for LGBTQ people. ... She believed that the best way to change hearts and minds was through comedy," Dominguez said in a statement.

Before "Will & Grace," Morrison was best known for playing Sister Sixto on "The Flying Nun" alongside Sally Field from 1967 to 1970.

She guest-starred on dozens of television series starting in the early 1960s, including "The Fugitive," "L.A. Law" and "Murder, She Wrote." Most recently, she voiced a character, Mrs. Portillo, on the Disney animated series "Handy Manny."

Born Rachel Mitrani to Jewish parents from Spain in the Bronx, New York, in 1936, Morrison spoke primarily Spanish as a child. She was often cast as Latina characters, but she played a range of ethnicities in theater, television and film.

She appeared with Dean Martin in 1968's "How to Save a Marriage and Ruin Your Life," with Barbra Streisand in "Funny Girl" the same year, with Gregory Peck in 1969's "Mackenna's Gold," with Shelley Long in "Troop Beverly Hills" in 1989, and with Salma Hayek in "Fools Rush In" in 1997.

FILE - In this Dec. 21, 2009, file photo, John Witherspoon leaves a taping of "The Late Show with David Letterman" in New York. Actor-comedian Witherspoon, who memorably played Ice Cube’s father in the “Friday” films, has died at age 77. Witherspoon’s manager Alex Goodman confirmed late Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019, that Witherspoon died in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actor-comedian John Witherspoon, who memorably played Ice Cube's father in the "Friday" films, has died. He was 77.

Witherspoon's manager Alex Goodman confirmed late Tuesday that Witherspoon died in Los Angeles. No cause of death was released.

The actor had a prolific career, co-starring in three "Friday" films, appearing on "The Wayans Bros." television series and voicing the grandfather in "The Boondocks" animated series. His film roles included "Vampire in Brooklyn" and "Boomerang," and he was a frequent guest on "Late Show with David Letterman."

For many his most recognizable role was "Pops," Ice Cube's father in the stoner comedy "Friday" and its two sequels, a crude but affectionate father trying to guide his son to be better.

"Life won't be as funny without him," Ice Cube said in a Twitter post late Tuesday, adding that he was devastated by news of Witherspoon's death.

Regina King, who appeared as Witherspoon's daughter in "Friday" and also voiced both of his grandsons in the animated series "The Boondocks" called him her "comedic inspiration" on Twitter.

Goodman referred to a family statement issued to the website Deadline that said the family was in shock over Witherspoon's death.

The statement says Witherspoon, who was born on Jan. 27, 1942, is survived by his wife, Angela, and sons JD and Alexander.

"We'd roast each other like homies more than Father & Son, and I really liked that. He was my best friend & my idol," JD Witherspoon posted. "Love U Dad...I'll miss u."

FILE - This Oct. 14, 2004 file photo shows actor Bill Macy at the premiere of the movie "Surviving Christmas," in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Macy, who starred opposite Bea Arthur in the 1970s sitcom “Maude," died Thursday Oct. 17, 2019 in Los Angeles, friend Matt Beckoff said Friday. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Bill Macy, the character actor whose hangdog expression was a perfect match for his role as the long-suffering foil to Bea Arthur's unyielding feminist on the daring 1970s sitcom "Maude," has died. He was 97.

Macy died Thursday night in Los Angeles, his friend Matt Beckoff said Friday. Further details weren't immediately available from Beckoff or Macy's wife, Samantha Harper Macy.

The stint as Walter Findlay on the CBS sitcom that aired from 1972-78 was Macy's highest-profile in a long stage, film and TV career. He made dozens of guest appearances in series including "Seinfeld," ''How I Met Your Mother" and "ER."

"Maude" was a spinoff to the landmark sitcom "All in the Family" from producers Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin. Staunch liberal Maude's sharp exchanges with conservative Archie Bunker (Carroll O'Connor) were so entertaining that Lear fashioned a series around her.

In a 1998 interview for the TV academy foundation's archive, Lear said he cast Macy as Maude Findlay's husband based on his work in an off-Broadway play. In it, his character had a prolonged scene of choking to death on a chicken bone.

Macy was born Wolf Garber on May 18, 1922, to Michael and Mollie Garber in Revere, Massachusetts. He had a long career in the theater and film before "Maude," including as an original cast member of the 1969-72 New York stage sensation "Oh! Calcutta!" that featured fully nude actors. He was in the 1972 movie version of the musical about sexual mores.

Among Macy's other movie credits are 2006's "The Holiday"; 1999's "Analyze This"; the 1979 Steve Martin comedy "The Jerk," and 1982's "My Favorite Year" starring Peter O'Toole, an affectionate behind-the-scenes look at a 1950s TV variety series.

Macy, as head comedy writer for temperamental star King Kaiser (Joseph Bologna), used his gifts to great effect, as he later would while playing spouse to demanding Maude.

Among them: his distinctively puffy-eyed, beset-upon expression of suffering, and an ability to slide deftly into explosive frustration.

"Maude" also gave Macy the chance to turn serious. In one story line he descended into alcoholism and struck Maude; in another he offered tender support in a provocative episode when she decided to end an unexpected, late-in-life pregnancy.

In real life, strangers would call him "Mr. Maude" and, presuming that he and Walter really were the same people, console him for having such a difficult wife.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rip Taylor, the madcap mustached comedian with a fondness for confetti-throwing who became a television game show mainstay in the 1970s, has died. He was 84.

The man who would become known worldwide as Rip did not have a direct line into show business. He was born Charles Elmer Taylor Jr. in Washington, D.C., to a waitress and a musician and first worked as a congressional page before serving in the Army during the Korean War, where he started performing standup.

His ascent began with spots on "The Ed Sullivan Show," where he was known as the "crying comedian." The moniker pre-dated his television stints, however, and went back to his time in the Catskills.

"I sat on a stool telling jokes, and nobody was laughing," he told UPI in 1992. "In desperation, I pretended to cry as I begged them to laugh. That killed 'em."

Although he readily admitted stealing jokes from USO shows, the crying comedian bit got him to Ed Sullivan, where the host — forgetting Taylor's name — would say "get me the crying comedian."

Success begat more success, and Taylor ended up on tour with Judy Garland and Eleanor Powell in Las Vegas in 1966.

In his over five decades in entertainment, Taylor would make over 2,000 guest star appearances on shows like "The Monkees," ''The Merv Griffin Show," ''The Tonight Show," ''Late Night with David Letterman," ''Hollywood Squares" and "The Gong Show." He also hosted the beauty pageant spoof "The $1.98 Beauty Show."

With his bushy blonde toupee, exaggerated eyebrows and walrus-like mustache, Taylor was a striking presence. He was apparently so proud of his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame that he'd regularly schedule trips to buff and clean the square at 6625 Hollywood Boulevard.

Taylor also did a fair share of voice work for animated films and television like "The Jetsons" and "The Addams Family," as Uncle Fester, which earned him an Emmy nomination.

He played himself in movies like "Wayne's World 2" and the "Jackass" movies, appeared on stage in "Anything Goes," ''A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," ''Sugar Babies," where he took over for Mickey Rooney, as Fagin in "Oliver!" and Captain Hook in "Peter Pan." Taylor also wrote and performed an autobiographical one-man play called "It Ain't All Confetti."

"Rip is funny because he's crazy. Every night on stage, he's cornered and put-upon," Taylor said. "That's what I am bringing into play as a straight actor."

He is survived by his longtime partner Robert Fortney. In lieu of flowers, they ask that donations be made to the Thalians, a charitable organization that Taylor supported that is dedicated to mental health issues.

FILE - In this Aug. 20, 1967 file photo, members of the rock group Cream depart from Heathrow Airport in London, for their American tour. The trio, walking with unidentified female companions, from left are, base guitarist Jack Bruce, drummer Ginger Baker, and lead guitarist Eric Clapton. Baker, the volatile and propulsive British musician who was best known for his time with the power trio Cream, died Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019, at age 80, his family said. (AP Photo/Peter Kemp, File)

LONDON (AP) — Ginger Baker, the volatile and propulsive drummer for Cream and other bands who wielded blues power and jazz finesse and helped shatter boundaries of time, tempo and style in popular music, died Sunday at age 80, his family said.

With blazing eyes, orange-red hair and a temperament to match, the London native ranked with The Who's Keith Moon and Led Zeppelin's John Bonham as the embodiment of musical and personal fury. Using twin bass drums, Baker fashioned a pounding, poly-rhythmic style uncommonly swift and heavy that inspired and intimidated countless musicians. But every beat seemed to mirror an offstage eruption — whether his violent dislike of Cream bandmate Jack Bruce or his on-camera assault of a documentary maker, Jay Bulger, whom he smashed in the nose with his walking stick.

Baker's family said on Twitter that he died Sunday: "We are very sad to say that Ginger has passed away peacefully in hospital this morning."

His daughter Nettie confirmed that Baker died in Britain but gave no other details. The family had said on Sept. 25 that Baker was critically ill in the hospital.

While Rolling Stone magazine once ranked him the third-greatest rock drummer of all time, behind Moon and Bonham, Baker had contempt for Moon and others he dismissed as "bashers" without style or background. Baker and his many admirers saw him as a rounded, sophisticated musician — an arranger, composer and student of the craft, absorbing sounds from around the world. He had been playing jazz since he was a teenager and spent years in Africa in the 1970s, forming a close friendship with the Nigerian musician-activist Fela Kuti.

"He was so unique and had such a distinctive personality," Stewart Copeland of the Police told www.musicradar.com in 2013. "Nobody else followed in his footsteps. Everybody tried to be John Bonham and copy his licks, but it's rare that you hear anybody doing the Ginger Baker thing."

But many fans thought of Baker as a rock star, who teamed with Eric Clapton and Bruce in the mid-1960s to become Cream — one of the first supergroups and first power trios. All three were known individually in the London blues scene and together they helped make rock history by elevating instrumental prowess above the songs themselves, even as they had hits with "Sunshine of Your Love," ''I Feel Free" and "White Room."

Cream was among the most successful acts of its time, selling more than 10 million records. But by 1968 Baker and Bruce had worn each other out and even Clapton had tired of their deafening, marathon jams, including the Baker showcase "Toad," one of rock's first extended drum solos. Cream split up at the end of the year, departing with two sold-out shows at London's Albert Hall. When told by Bulger that he was a founding father of heavy metal, Baker snarled that the genre "should have been aborted."

To the surprise of many, especially Clapton, he and Baker were soon part of another super group, Blind Faith, which also featured singer-keyboardist Stevie Winwood and bassist Ric Grech.

As Clapton would recall, he and Winwood had been playing informally when Baker turned up (Baker would allege that Clapton invited him). Named Blind Faith by a rueful Clapton, the band was overwhelmed by expectations from the moment it debuted in June 1969 before some 100,000 at a concert in London's Hyde Park. It split up after completing just one, self-titled album, as notable for its cover photo of a topless young girl as for its music. A highlight from the record: Baker's cymbal splashes on Winwood's lyrical ballad "Can't Find My Way Home."

"Beneath his somewhat abrasive exterior, there was a very sensitive human being with a heart of gold," Winwood said in a statement Sunday.

From the 1970s on, Baker was ever more unpredictable. He moved to Nigeria, took up polo, drove a Land Rover across the Sahara, lived on a ranch in South Africa, divorced his first wife and married three more times.

He recorded with Kuti and other Nigerians, jammed with Art Blakey, Elvin Jones and other jazz drummers and played with John Lydon's Public Image Ltd. He founded Ginger Baker's Air Force, which cost a fortune and imploded after two albums. He endured his old enemy, Bruce, when Cream was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993 and for Cream reunion concerts a decade later.  Bruce died in 2014.

Baker continued to perform regularly in his 70s despite arthritis, heart trouble, hearing loss dating from his years with Cream and lung disease from smoking. A stranger to no vice, immodesty included, he called his memoir "Hellraiser: The Autobiography of the World's Greatest Drummer."

"John Bonham once made a statement that there were only two drummers in British rock 'n' roll; himself and Ginger Baker," Baker wrote in his book. "My reaction to this was, 'You cheeky little bastard!'"

Born in 1939, Peter Edward Baker was the son of a bricklayer killed during World War II when Ginger was just 4. His father left behind a letter that Ginger Baker would quote from: "Use your fists; they're your best pals so often."

Baker was a drummer from early on, even rapping out rhythms on his school desk as he mimicked the big band music he loved and didn't let the occasional caning from a teacher deter him. As a teenager, he was playing in local groups and was mentored by percussionist Phil Seamen.

"At this party, there was a little band and all the kids chanted at me, 'Play the drums!''', Baker told The Independent in 2009. "I'd never sat behind a kit before, but I sat down — and I could play! One of the musicians turned round and said, 'Bloody hell, we've got a drummer', and I thought, 'Bloody hell, I'm a drummer.'"

Baker came of age just as London was learning the blues, with such future superstars as Clapton, Mick Jagger and Jimmy Page among the pioneers. Baker joined Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated, where he met (and soon disliked, for allegedly playing too loud) the Scottish-born bassist Jack Bruce, with whom he was thrown together again as members of the popular British group the Graham Bond Organization.

Clapton, meanwhile, was London's hottest guitarist, thanks to his work with the Yardbirds and John Mayall's Blues Breakers, his extraordinary speed and agility inspiring "Clapton is God" graffiti. Clapton, Baker and Bruce would call their band Cream because they considered themselves the best musicians around.

"Oh for god's sake, I've never played rock," Baker told the blog JazzWax in 2013. "Cream was two jazz players and a blues guitarist playing improvised music. We never played the same thing two nights running. Jack and I had been in jazz bands for years. All that stuff I did on the drums in Cream didn't come from drugs, either. It was from me. It was jazz."

FILE - This 1972 file image shows singer and actress Diahann Carroll. Carroll died, Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, at her home in Los Angeles after a long bout with cancer. She was 84. (AP Photo/Jean-Jacques Levy, File)

NEW YORK — Diahann Carroll, the Oscar-nominated actress and singer who won critical acclaim as the first black woman to star in a non-servant role in a TV series as "Julia," has died. She was 84.

Carroll's daughter, Susan Kay, told The Associated Press her mother died Friday in Los Angeles of cancer.

During her long career, Carroll earned a Tony Award for the musical "No Strings" and an Academy Award nomination for "Claudine."

But she was perhaps best known for her pioneering work on "Julia." Carroll played Julia Baker, a nurse whose husband had been killed in Vietnam, in the groundbreaking situation comedy that aired from 1968 to 1971.

Although she was not the first black woman to star in her own TV show (Ethel Waters played a maid in the 1950s series "Beulah"), she was the first to star as someone other than a servant.

NBC executives were wary about putting "Julia" on the network during the racial unrest of the 1960s, but it was an immediate hit.

It had its critics, though, including some who said Carroll's character, who is the mother of a young son, was not a realistic portrayal of a black American woman in the 1960s.

"They said it was a fantasy," Carroll recalled in 1998. "All of this was untrue. Much about the character of Julia I took from my own life, my family."

Not shy when it came to confronting racial barriers, Carroll won her Tony portraying a high-fashion American model in Paris who has a love affair with a white American author in the 1959 Richard Rodgers musical "No Strings." Critic Walter Kerr described her as "a girl with a sweet smile, brilliant dark eyes and a profile regal enough to belong on a coin."

She appeared often in plays previously considered exclusive territory for white actresses: "Same Time, Next Year," ''Agnes of God" and "Sunset Boulevard" (as faded star Norma Desmond, the role played by Gloria Swanson in the 1950 film.)

"I like to think that I opened doors for other women, although that wasn't my original intention," she said in 2002.

Her film career was sporadic. She began with a secondary role in "Carmen Jones" in 1954 and five years later appeared in "Porgy and Bess," although her singing voice was dubbed because it wasn't considered strong enough for the Gershwin opera. Her other films included "Goodbye Again," ''Hurry Sundown," ''Paris Blues," and "The Split."

The 1974 film "Claudine" provided her most memorable role. She played a hard-bitten single mother of six who finds romance in Harlem with a garbage man played by James Earl Jones.

In the 1980s, she appeared in the long-running prime-time soap opera "Dynasty" for three years. More recently, she had a number of guest shots and small roles in TV series, including playing the mother of Isaiah Washington's character, Dr. Preston Burke, on "Grey's Anatomy."

She also returned to her roots in nightclubs. In 2006, she made her first club appearance in New York in four decades, singing at Feinstein's at the Regency. Reviewing a return engagement in 2007, a New York Times critic wrote that she sang "Both Sides Now" with "the reflective tone of a woman who has survived many severe storms and remembers every lightning flash and thunderclap."

Carol Diann Johnson was born in New York City and attended the High School for the Performing Arts. Her father was a subway conductor and her mother a homemaker.

She began her career as a model, but a prize from "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts" TV show led to nightclub engagements.

In her 1998 memoir "Diahann," Carroll traced her turbulent romantic life, which included liaisons with Harry Belafonte, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Sammy Davis Jr., Sidney Poitier and David Frost. She even became engaged to Frost, but the engagement was canceled.

An early marriage to nightclub owner Monte Kay resulted in Carroll's only child, Suzanne, as well as a divorce. She also divorced her second husband, retail executive Freddie Glusman, later marrying magazine editor Robert DeLeon, who died.

Her most celebrated marriage was in 1987, to singer Vic Damone, and the two appeared together in nightclubs. But they separated in 1991 and divorced several years later.

After she was treated for breast cancer in 1998, she spoke out for more money for research and for free screening for women who couldn't afford mammograms.

"We all look forward to the day that mastectomies, chemotherapy and radiation are considered barbaric," Carroll told a gathering in 2000.

FILE - This July 4, 2010 file photo shows American opera singer Jessye Norman performing on the Stravinski Hall stage at the 44th Montreux Jazz Festival, in Montreux, Switzerland. Norman died, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019, at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York. She was 74. (AP Photo/Keystone/Dominic Favre, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Jessye Norman, the renowned international opera star whose passionate soprano voice won her four Grammy Awards, the National Medal of Arts and the Kennedy Center Honor, has died, according to family spokesperson Gwendolyn Quinn. She was 74.

A statement released to The Associated Press on Monday said Norman died at 7:54 a.m. EDT from septic shock and multi-organ failure secondary to complications of a spinal cord injury she suffered in 2015. She died at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital in New York, and was surrounded by loved ones.

"We are so proud of Jessye's musical achievements and the inspiration that she provided to audiences around the world that will continue to be a source of joy. We are equally proud of her humanitarian endeavors addressing matters such as hunger, homelessness, youth development, and arts and culture education," the family statement read.

Norman was a trailblazing performer, and one of the rare black singers to attain worldwide stardom in the opera world, performing at such revered houses like La Scala and the Metropolitan Opera, and singing title roles in works like "Carmen," ''Aida" and more. She sang the works of Wagner, but was not limited to opera or classical music, performing songs by Duke Ellington and others as well.

"I have always been drawn to things other people might consider unusual. I'm always taken by the text and beautiful melody. It's not important to me who has written it. It's just more reasonable to have an open mind about what beauty is," Norman said in a 2002 interview with the Chicago Sun-Times. "It's important for classical musicians to stretch and think beyond the three B's (Bach, Beethoven and Brahms). They were wonderful composers, but they went to the great beyond a long time ago. There's lots of music that will live for a very long time."

Norman certainly knew no boundaries or limits. She broke barriers and had hoped her industry would see more faces like hers.

"It is a more diverse place, thank goodness," Norman said of the opera world in a 2004 interview with NPR, "I wish it were even more diverse than it is."

Norman was born on September 15, 1945 in Augusta, Georgia, in segregationist times. She grew up singing in church and around a musical family that included pianists and singers. She earned a scholarship to the historically black college Howard University in Washington, D.C., to study music, and later studied at the Peabody Conservatory and the University of Michigan.

Eventually she made her operatic debut in 1969 in Berlin, wowing audiences around the world on stages in Milan, London and New York thanks to her shining vocals, no matter the language. The New York Times described her voice as "a grand mansion of sound."

"It defines an extraordinary space. It has enormous dimensions, reaching backward and upward. It opens onto unexpected vistas. It contains sunlit rooms, narrow passageways, cavernous falls," the Times' Edward Rothstein wrote.

"Starting with her Met debut as Cassandra in Berlioz's Les Troyens on Opening Night of the Met's centennial 1983-84 season, Norman sang more than 80 performances with the company, dazzling audiences with her beautiful tone, extraordinary power, and musical sensitivity," the statement read.

Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said: "Farewell to the beloved Jessye Norman, a woman of vision, adventure and joy. A glorious voice and beautiful soul has winged towards Heaven. Her legacy lives on in music and the children who greet art in her name each day." And Broadway legend Audra McDonald wrote on Twitter, "UGH! Nooooooo! This is awful. I was literally supposed to spend time with her next week. RIP most magnificent amazing brilliant Diva."

In 1997, at age 52, Norman became the youngest person ever to earn the Kennedy Center Honor in the organization's 20-year history at the time. She received her National Medal of Arts from former President Barack Obama and has earned honorary doctorates from a number of prestigious schools, including Juilliard, Harvard and Yale. She is a member of British Royal Academy of Music and Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Norman even has orchid named after her in France, and the country also made her a Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.

She's earned 15 Grammy nominations throughout her illustrious career, picking up her first at the 1985 show for best classical vocal soloist performance for "Ravel: Songs Of Maurice Ravel." She earned Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006.

Norman also gave back, raising funds to help students attend school, championing the arts in schools and championing diversity.

"I look at symphony orchestras around this country and I want those orchestras to look more like the demographic they're meant to serve. I would like to see more African-Americans on the stage at the Metropolitan Opera here in New York. There are certainly some, but not nearly enough, and I come across so many singers who are terribly gifted and that would be an asset to these opera companies around our country. But we still have these people who are just a little bit hesitant, and perhaps not as openhearted ... as I'd like them to be," she said. "I look forward to the day when we do not think about color of skin when we're looking to have a person do a job, whatever that job is."

The Jessye Norman School of the Arts opened in 2003 in Augusta to provide a free fine arts education to disadvantaged children. The Augusta Chronicle reported that Norman was set to attend the Oct. 11 street-naming ceremony in her hometown on Eighth Street, where the school is located. It will be named Jessye Norman Boulevard.

FILE - This Sept. 5, 2006 file photo shows journalist Sander Vanocur supporting Santa Barbara News-Press employees wishing to unionize during a news conference in Santa Barbara, Calif. Vanocur, a network news reporter who for decades covered the biggest moments in politics, died Monday, Sept. 16, 2019, in Santa Barbara, Calif. He was 91. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sander Vanocur, a television newsman who for decades covered momentous events from political campaigns to assassinations, the Vietnam War to the civil rights movement, has died, his son said Tuesday.

Vanocur died Monday night in Santa Barbara, California, said Chris Vanocur. He was 91. He had been dealing with dementia in recent years.

As national political correspondent at NBC in the 1960s, Vanocur was a questioner at the first presidential debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon in 1960, then covered Kennedy's administration as a White House correspondent.

"His storied career put him on the front lines of the biggest political stories of the 1960s, the first stories being televised for many of us," NBC News political director Chuck Todd said in a segment Tuesday.

Vanocur was among the last people to interview Sen. Robert F. Kennedy at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, where he was assassinated shortly after winning the California Democratic primary in his run for president in 1968.

Vanocur was probably most familiar to TV viewers from his reporting on the floor of political conventions, including the violent 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago. He and three NBC colleagues who reported on the conventions, Frank McGee, John Chancellor and Edwin Newman, became known as the Four Horsemen. Vanocur was the last survivor of the four.

He was also the last survivor of the four questioners at the Nixon-Kennedy debate. Vanocur said while he had a front-row seat to one of the most important moments in 20th century politics, he felt like he missed it because he hadn't seen it like a viewer would have.

"We didn't know what it looked like," Vanocur said in a 2011 interview. "You didn't see it through television when you were on the panel."

In 1977, Vanocur was hired by ABC News, where he served as a correspondent until 1991. He was the moderator at another historic debate in the 1984 vice presidential contest between George H.W. Bush and Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman to run for vice presidential from a major party.

Born in Cleveland, Vanocur moved to Peoria, Illinois when he was 12, and earned a degree in political science from Northwestern University in 1950.

He served in the U.S. Army in Europe and attended the London School of Economics, beginning his journalism career while in England. His son said he was sold when he wrote a letter to the editor that appeared in the Manchester Guardian.

"Once he saw his name in print, his career changed," said Chris Vanocur, who is also a television journalist.

Vanocur returned to the U.S. and covered city news for The New York Times then landed at NBC in the late 1950s.

Politics and war took up much of his time, but the civil rights issue was Vanocur's favorite subject to cover, his son said, because he believed in the cause.

In 1967 he interviewed Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, 11 months before King was assassinated, leading King through a long discussion about the struggles in moving his cause forward after a decade.

Vanocur left NBC in 1971 and worked for PBS and the Washington Post before landing at ABC News, where he would serve as a correspondent in Buenos Aires, host the weekly show "Business World," and cover several more conventions and elections.

He married fashion designer and writer Edith Pick in 1956 and had two sons, Chris and Nicholas, who died in 2015. Pick died in 1975, and soon after Vanocur married Virginia Backus Vanocur, who was his wife for the 44 years until his death.

In this April 19, 2017, file photo, Cokie Roberts speaks during the opening ceremony for Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. Roberts, a longtime political reporter and analyst at ABC News and NPR has died, ABC announced Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. She was 75. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

NEW YORK (AP) — Cokie Roberts, the daughter of politicians who grew up to cover the family business in Washington for ABC News and NPR over several decades, died Tuesday in Washington of complications from breast cancer.

Roberts was the daughter of Hale Boggs, a former House majority leader from Louisiana, and Lindy Boggs, who succeeded her husband in the job. Roberts worked in radio and at CBS News and PBS before joining ABC News in 1988.

She was a congressional reporter and analyst who co-anchored the Sunday political show "This Week" with Sam Donaldson from 1996 to 2002.

Roberts, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002, kept working nearly to the end. She appeared on "This Week" in August, drawing enough concern about her evident weight loss that she released a statement saying "I am doing fine" and was looking forward to covering next year's election.

She co-wrote a political column for many years with her husband of 53 years, Steven, who survives. They had two children.

Roberts wrote books, focusing on the role of women in history. She wrote two with her husband, one about interfaith families and "From This Day Forward," an account of their marriage.

Current ABC News political reporter Jonathan Karl recalled being in awe of Roberts when he first started working at the network.

Her colleagues said she never became cynical or lost her love for politics. She did force NPR to clarify her role as a commentator when she wrote a column in 2016 calling on "the rational wing" of the Republican party to reject Donald Trump as their presidential candidate.

FILE - In this April 14, 2018, file photo, Ric Ocasek, from the Cars, performs during the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction ceremony in Cleveland. Ocasek, famed frontman for The Cars rock band, has been found dead in a New York City apartment. The New York City police department said officers responding to a 911 call found the 75-year-old Ocasek on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2019. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Ric Ocasek, The Cars frontman whose deadpan vocal delivery and lanky, sunglassed look defined a rock era with chart-topping hits like "Just What I Needed," was discovered dead Sunday afternoon in his Manhattan apartment.

The New York Police Department said that officers found the 75-year-old Ocasek at about 4 p.m. after responding to a 911 call. They said there were no signs of foul play and that the medical examiner was to determine a cause of death.

The death comes a year after The Cars were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, followed by an announcement by model Paulina Porizkova on social media that she and Ocasek had separated after 28 years of marriage. The pair first met while filming the music video for "Drive," another Cars hit.

Ocasek, who sang, played guitar and wrote most of the band's songs, and Benjamin Orr, who played bass and also sang, were ex-hippie buddies who formed The Cars in Boston in 1976. They were a decade older than many of their modern-rock compatriots but became one of the most essential American bands of the late 1970s and 1980s with their fusion of new wave, 1960s pop and 1970s glam.

Ocasek's minimalist, half-spoken deadpan vocals set made the band's sound, and his long, lanky appearance formed their lasting image.

The first three songs on their 1978 self-titled first album were all hit singles and remain widely known classics and oldies radio airplay: "Good Times Roll," ''My Best Friend's Girl" and "Just What I Needed."

They had 10 other singles in the Billboard top 40, and of their six studio albums, four were in Billboard's top 10.

The band's commercial peak came with 1984's "Heartbeat City," which featured the hit singles "You Might Think" and "Magic," sung by Ocasek, and the atypical ballad "Drive," sung by Orr.

They were always an MTV favorite, and the whimsical, partly animated video for "You Might Think" along with the mournful video for "Drive" brought them near-constant airplay on the channel in the mid-1980s.

The band broke up in 1988, but their influence would be deeply felt in the 1990s and beyond. Kurt Cobain and Nirvana covered "My Best Friend's Girl" at their last live show in 1994, and Ocasek produced albums for younger bands including Weezer, No Doubt and Bad Religion.

The Cars were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2018 after being nominated twice before. During the ceremony, Ocasek paid tribute to Orr, who died in 2000 of pancreatic cancer.

In announcing the separation last year, Porizkova said that their family is "a well-built car." But she says that "as a bicycle, my husband and I no longer pedal in unison." Ocasek had six sons, two from each of his three marriages.

He grew up in Baltimore, and his family moved to Cleveland when he was a teenager. After graduating high school he had stints at Antioch College and Bowling Green State University in the mid-1960s before dropping out to pursue music.

Ocasek met Orr in 1965 and they formed their own first band called ID Nirvana in 1968. In the 1970s they relocated to Boston and formed bands including the folk-rock Milkwood and also played as an acoustic duo before finding their calling when they created The Cars.

FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2010 file photo, Eddie Money sings the national anthem before an NCAA college basketball game between Kansas and Missouri in Lawrence, Kan. Family members have said Eddie Money has died on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

A publicist for rock star Eddie Money has died after he recently announced he had stage 4 esophageal cancer.

Cindy Ronzoni provided a statement from the family saying he died peacefully Friday morning in Los Angeles. He was 70.

The husky-voiced, blue collar performer was known for such hits as "Two Tickets to Paradise" and "Take Me Home Tonight." In 1987, he received a best rock vocal Grammy nomination for "Take Me Home Tonight," which featured a cameo from Ronnie Spector.

FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 23, 2009 file photo, Peter Fonda, poses atop a Harley-Davidson motorcycle in Glendale, Calif. Fonda, the son of a Hollywood legend who became a movie star in his own right both writing and starring in counterculture classics like “Easy Rider,” has died. His family says in a statement that Fonda died Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, at his home in Los Angeles. He was 79. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actor Peter Fonda, the son of a Hollywood legend who became a movie star in his own right after both writing and starring in the counter-culture classic "Easy Rider," died Friday at his home of complications from lung cancer. He was 79.

"I am very sad," Jane Fonda said in a statement. "He was my sweet-hearted baby brother. The talker of the family. I have had beautiful alone time with him these last days. He went out laughing."

Born into Hollywood royalty as Henry Fonda's only son, Peter Fonda carved his own path with his non-conformist tendencies and earned an Oscar nomination for co-writing the psychedelic road trip movie "Easy Rider." He would never win that golden statuette, but he would later be nominated for his leading performance as a Vietnam veteran and widowed beekeeper in "Ulee's Gold."

Fonda was born in New York in 1940 to parents whose personas were the very opposite of the rebellious images their kids would cultivate. Father Henry Fonda was already a Hollywood giant, known for playing straight-shooting cowboys and soldiers. Mother Frances Ford Seymour was a Canadian-born U.S. socialite.

He was only 10 years old when his mother died. She had a nervous breakdown after learning of her husband's affair and was confined to a hospital. In 1950, she killed herself. It would be about five years before Peter Fonda learned the truth behind her death.

Fonda accidentally shot himself and nearly died on his 11th birthday. It was a story he told often, including during an acid trip with members of The Beatles and The Byrds during which Fonda reportedly said, "I know what it's like to be dead."

Fonda went to private schools in Massachusetts and Connecticut as a child, moving on to the University of Nebraska in his father's home state, joining the same acting group — the Omaha Community Playhouse — where Henry Fonda got his start.

He then returned to New York and joined the Cecilwood Theatre, getting small roles on Broadway and guest parts on television shows including "Naked City" and "Wagon Train."

Fonda had an estranged relationship with his father throughout most of his life, but he said that they grew closer over the years before Henry Fonda died in 1982.

"Peter is all deep sweetness, kind and sensitive to his core. He would never intentionally harm anything or anyone. In fact, he once argued with me that vegetables had souls (it was the '60s)," his sister Jane Fonda said in her 2005 memoir. "He has a strange, complex mind that grasps and hangs on to details ranging from the minutiae of his childhood to cosmic matters, with a staggering amount in between. Dad couldn't appreciate and nurture Peter's sensitivity, couldn't see him as he was. Instead he tried to shame Peter into his own image of stoic independence."

Although Peter never achieved the status of his father or even his older sister, the impact of "Easy Rider," which just celebrated its 50th anniversary, was enough to cement his place in popular culture.

Fonda collaborated with another struggling young actor, Dennis Hopper, on the script about two weed-smoking, drug-slinging bikers on a trip through the Southwest as they make their way to New Orleans for Mardi Gras.

On the way, Fonda and Hopper befriend a drunken young lawyer — Jack Nicholson in a breakout role — but raise the dander of Southern rednecks and are murdered before they can return home.

Fonda's character Wyatt wore a stars-and-stripes helmet and rode a motorcycle called "Captain America," re-purposing traditional images for the counter-culture.

"'Easy Rider' depicted the rise of hippie culture, condemned the establishment, and celebrated freedom," Douglas wrote. "Peter Fonda embodied those values and instilled them in a generation."

Fonda had played bikers before "Easy Rider." In the 1966 Roger Corman-directed "Wild Angels," in which he plays Heavenly Blues, leader of a band of Hells Angels, Fonda delivers a speech that could've served as both a personal mantra and a manifesto for the youth of the '60s.

"We wanna be free!" Fonda tells a preacher in the film. "We wanna be free to do what we wanna do. We wanna be free to ride. We wanna be free to ride our machines without being hassled by the man! And we wanna get loaded!"

Fonda produced "Easy Rider" and Hopper directed it for a meager $380,000. It went on to gross $40 million worldwide, a substantial sum for its time.

The film was a hit at Cannes, netted a best screenplay Oscar nomination for Fonda, Hopper and Terry Southern, and has since been listed on the American Film Institute's ranking of the top 100 American films. The establishment gave its official blessing in 1998 when "Easy Rider" was included in the United States National Film Registry for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

In 1969, he told The Associated Press that, "As for my generation, it was time they started doing their own speaking. There has been too much of the 'silent majority' — at both ends of the generation gap."

He did reflect later in a 2015 interview with The Hollywood Reporter that it may have impacted his career prospects: "It certainly put a nail in the coffin of 'the next Dean Jones at Disney.' "

Fonda's output may have been prolific, but he was not always well-regarded, which he was acutely aware of. But he said that "Ulee's Gold," which came out in 1997, was the "most fun" he'd ever had making a movie. He wore the same wire-rimmed glasses his father wore in "On Golden Pond," although he said beyond that he was not channeling Henry Fonda in the performance. He lost out on the Oscar to Nicholson, who won for "As Good as It Gets."

Nicholson said in his acceptance speech that it as an honor to be nominated alongside "my old bike pal Fonda."

He remained prolific for the rest of his life with notable performances as the heel in Steven Soderbergh's "The Limey," from 1999, and in James Mangold's 2007 update of "3:10 to Yuma." He'd even play himself in an episode of the spoof documentary series "Documentary Now!" about life as "an Oscar Bridesmaid."

Fonda is survived by his third wife, Margaret DeVogelaere, his daughter, actress Bridget Fonda and son, Justin, both from his first marriage to Susan Brewer.

"In one of the saddest moments of our lives, we are not able to find the appropriate words to express the pain in our hearts," the family said in a statement. "As we grieve, we ask that you respect our privacy."

FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2016, file photo, from left to right, sportscasters Phil Simms, Jack Whitaker and Jim Nantz participate in the "CBS Sports" panel at the CBS 2016 Winter TCA in Pasadena, Calif. Whitaker, whose Hall of Fame broadcasting career ranged from the first Super Bowl to Secretariat's Triple Crown to short essays from major sporting events, died Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019, CBS reported. The network said Whitaker died of natural causes in his sleep in Devon, Pa. He was 95. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/In vision/AP, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Jack Whitaker, whose Hall of Fame broadcasting career ranged from the first Super Bowl to Secretariat's Triple Crown to short essays from major sporting events, died Sunday morning, CBS reported.

Whitaker, a Philadelphia native who was wounded on Omaha Beach three days after the D-Day Invasion, began his broadcast career at WCAU-TV in Philadelphia and spent 22 years for CBS Sports. He worked for ABC from 1982 in the news and sports divisions, and was part of the network's Olympics coverage in 1984 and 1988.

"I grew up watching him deliver contemplative and contextual prose with his famous short essays, bringing class and dignity to his industry," Jim Nantz, the lead CBS Sports announcer, said in a statement. "I spoke to him this week after hospice came to his home, and his mind was still brilliantly sharp right to the end."

CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus said Whitaker's writing, presence on air and humanity were unmatched.

"His unique perspective on sports ranging from horse racing to golf to NFL football was extraordinary," McManus said.

FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2005 file photo, author Toni Morrison listens to Mexicos Carlos Monsivais during the Julio Cortazar professorship conference at the Guadalajara's University in Guadalajara City, Mexico. The Nobel Prize-winning author has died. Publisher Alfred A. Knopf says Morrison died Monday, Aug. 5, 2019 at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. She was 88. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, a pioneer and reigning giant of modern literature whose imaginative power in "Beloved," ''Song of Solomon" and other works transformed American letters by dramatizing the pursuit of freedom within the boundaries of race, has died at age 88.

Publisher Alfred A. Knopf announced that Morrison died Monday night at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Morrison's family issued a statement through Knopf saying she died after a brief illness.

"Toni Morrison passed away peacefully last night surrounded by family and friends," the family announced. "She was an extremely devoted mother, grandmother, and aunt who reveled in being with her family and friends. The consummate writer who treasured the written word, whether her own, her students or others, she read voraciously and was most at home when writing."

Few authors rose in such rapid, spectacular style. She was nearly 40 when her first novel, "The Bluest Eye," was published. By her early 60s, after just six novels, she had become the first black woman to receive the Nobel literature prize, praised in 1993 by the Swedish academy for her "visionary force" and for her delving into "language itself, a language she wants to liberate" from categories of black and white. In 2019, she was featured in an acclaimed documentary, "Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am."

Morrison helped raise American multiculturalism to the world stage and helped uncensor her country's past, unearthing the lives of the unknown and the unwanted, those she would call "the unfree at the heart of the democratic experiment." In her novels, history — black history — was a trove of poetry, tragedy, love, adventure and good old gossip, whether in small-town Ohio in "Sula" or big-city Harlem in "Jazz." She regarded race as a social construct and through language founded the better world her characters suffered to attain. Morrison wove everything from African literature and slave folklore to the Bible and Gabriel Garcia Marquez into the most diverse, yet harmonious, of literary communities.

"Narrative has never been merely entertainment for me," she said in her Nobel lecture. "It is, I believe, one of the principal ways in which we absorb knowledge."

Winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for "Beloved," she was one of the book world's most regal presences, with her expanse of graying braids; her dark, discerning eyes; and warm, theatrical voice, able to lower itself to a mysterious growl or rise to a humorous falsetto. "That handsome and perceptive lady," James Baldwin called her.

Her admirers were countless — from fellow authors, college students and working people to Barack Obama, who awarded her a Presidential Medal of Freedom; to Oprah Winfrey, who idolized Morrison and helped greatly expand her readership. Morrison shared those high opinions, repeatedly labeling one of her novels, "Love," as "perfect" and rejecting the idea that artistic achievement called for quiet acceptance.

"Maya Angelou helped me without her knowing it," Morrison told The Associated Press during a 1998 interview. "When she was writing her first book, 'I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,' I was an editor at Random House. She was having such a good time, and she never said, 'Who me? My little book?'

"I decided that ... winning the (Nobel) prize was fabulous," Morrison added. "Nobody was going to take that and make it into something else. I felt representational. I felt American. I felt Ohioan. I felt blacker than ever. I felt more woman than ever. I felt all of that, and put all of that together and went out and had a good time."

The second of four children of a welder and a domestic worker, Morrison was born Chloe Ardelia Wofford in Lorain, Ohio, a steel town outside of Cleveland. She was encouraged by her parents to read and to think, and was unimpressed by the white kids in her community. Recalling how she felt like an "aristocrat," Morrison believed she was smarter and took it for granted she was wiser. She was an honors student in high a school, and attended Howard University because she dreamed of life spent among black intellectuals.

At Howard, she spent much of her free time in the theater (she had a laugh that could easily reach the back row), later taught there and also met and married a Jamaican architect, Harold Morrison, whom she divorced in 1964. They had two children, Harold and Slade.

But although she went on to teach there, Howard disappointed her. Campus life seemed closer to a finishing school than to an institution of learning. Protesters, among them former Morrison student Stokely Carmichael, were demanding equality. Morrison wanted that, too, but wondered what kind.

"I thought they wanted to integrate for nefarious purposes," she said. "I thought they should demand money in those black schools. That was the problem — the resources, the better equipment, the better teachers, the buildings that were falling apart — not being in some high school next to some white kids."

In 1964, she answered an ad to work in the textbook division of Random House. Over the next 15 years, she would have an impact as a book editor, and as one of the few black women in publishing, that alone would have ensured her legacy. She championed emerging fiction authors such as Gayl Jones and Toni Cade Bambara, helped introduce U.S. readers to such African writers as Wole Solinka, worked on a memoir by Muhammad Ali and topical books by such activists as Angela Davis and Black Panther Huey Newton. A special project was editing "The Black Book," a collection of everything from newspaper advertisements to song lyrics that anticipated her immersion in the everyday lives of the past.

By the late '60s, she was a single mother and a determined writer who had been pushed by her future editor, Robert Gottlieb of Alfred A. Knopf, into deciding whether she'd write or edit. Seated at her kitchen table, she fleshed out a story based on a childhood memory of a black girl in Lorain — raped by her father — who desired blue eyes. She called the novel "The Bluest Eye."

Morrison prided herself on the gift of applying "invisible ink," making a point and leaving it to the reader to discover it, such as her decision to withhold the skin color of her characters in "Paradise." Her debut as an author came at the height of the Black Arts Movement and calls for literature as political and social protest. But Morrison criticized by indirection; she was political because of what she didn't say. Racism and sexism were assumed; she wrote about their effects, whether in "The Bluest Eye" or in "Sula," a story of friendship and betrayal between two black women.

"The writers who affected me the most were novelists who were writing in Africa: Chinua Achebe, 'Things Fall Apart,' was a major education for me," Morrison, who had studied William Faulkner and Virginia Woolf as a graduate student, told the AP in 1998.

"They took their black world for granted. No black writer (in America) had done that except for Jean Toomer with 'Cane.' Everybody else had some confrontation with white people, which was not to say that Africans didn't, but there was linguistically an assumption. The language was the language of the center of the world, which was them.

"So that made it possible for me to write 'The Bluest Eye' and not explain anything. That was wholly new! It was like a step into an absolutely brand new world. It was liberating in a way nothing had been before!"

She had no agent and was rejected by several publishers before reaching a deal with Holt, Rhinehart and Winston (now Henry Holt and Company), which released the novel in 1970. Sales were modest, but her book made a deep impression on The New York Times' John Leonard, an early and ongoing champion of her writing, which he called "so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry."

Setting her stories in segregated communities, where incest and suicide were no more outrageous then a sign which reads "COLORED ONLY," Morrison wrote of dreamers for whom the price was often death, whether the mother's tragic choice to murder her baby girl — and save it from slavery — in "Beloved," or the black community that implodes in "Paradise."

Like Faulkner, her characters are burdened by the legacy, and ongoing tragedy, of slavery and separation. For Faulkner's white Southerners, losers of the Civil War, the price is guilt, rage and madness; for Morrison's slaves and their descendants, supposedly liberated, history follows like the most unrelenting posse.

"The future was sunset; the past something to leave behind," Morrison wrote in "Beloved," in which the ghost of the slain daughter returns to haunt and obsess her mother.

"And if it didn't stay behind, well, you might have to stomp it out. Slave life; freed life — every day was a test and a trial. Nothing could be counted on in a world where even when you were a solution you were a problem."

Morrison's breakthrough came in 1977 with "Song of Solomon," her third novel and the story of young Milkman Dead's sexual, social and ancestral education. It was the first work by a black writer since Richard Wright's "Native Son" to be a full Book-of-the-Month selection and won the National Book Critics Circle award. It was also Morrison's first book to center on a male character, a novel which enabled her "get out of the house, to de-domesticate the landscape."

But the mainstream was another kind of education. Reviewing "Song of Solomon," author Reynolds Price chided Morrison for "the understandable but weakening omission of active white characters." (He later recanted). When "Beloved" was overlooked for a National Book Award, a letter of protest from 48 black writers, including Angelou and Amiri Baraka, was published in The New York Times Book Review, noting that Morrison had never won a major literary prize.

"Beloved" went on to win the Pulitzer and Morrison soon ascended to the very top of the literary world, winning the Nobel and presiding as unofficial laureate of Winfrey's book club, founded in 1996. Winfrey chose "Song of Solomon," ''The Bluest Eye," ''Paradise" and "Sula" over the years and would list all of Morrison's works as among her favorites. Winfrey also starred in and helped produce the 1998 film version of "Beloved."

As with so many other laureates, Morrison's post-Nobel fiction was viewed less favorably than her earlier work. Morrison received no major competitive awards after the Nobel and was criticized for awkward plotting and pretentious language in "Love" and "Paradise." But a novel published in 2008, "A Mercy," was highly praised. "Home," a brief novel about a young Korean War veteran, came out in 2012 and was followed three later by a contemporary drama, "God Help the Child."

Morrison's other works included "Playing in the Dark," a collection of essays; "Dreaming Emmet," a play about the slain teenager Emmett Till; and several children's books co-authored with her son, Slade Morrison (who died of cancer in 2010). In November 2016, she wrote a highly cited New York essay about the election of Donald Trump, calling his ascension to the presidency a mark of what whites would settle for to hold on to their status.

"So scary are the consequences of a collapse of white privilege that many Americans have flocked to a political platform that supports and translates violence against the defenseless as strength. These people are not so much angry as terrified, with the kind of terror that makes knees tremble," she wrote.

"William Faulkner understood this better than almost any other American writer. In 'Absalom, Absalom,' incest is less of a taboo for an upper-class Southern family than acknowledging the one drop of black blood that would clearly soil the family line. Rather than lose its "whiteness" (once again), the family chooses murder."

She taught for years at Princeton University, from which she retired in 2006, but also had an apartment in downtown Manhattan and a riverfront house in New York's Rockland County that burned down in 1993, destroying manuscripts, first editions of Faulkner and other writers and numerous family mementoes. She had the house rebuilt and continued to live and work there.

"When I'm not thinking about a novel, or not actually writing it, it's not very good; the 21st century is not a very nice place. I need it (writing) to just stay steady, emotionally," she told the AP in 2012.

"When I finished 'The Bluest Eye,' ... I was not pleased. I remember feeling sad. And then I thought, 'Oh, you know, everybody's talking about "sisterhood,'" I wanted to write about what women friends are really like. (The inspiration for 'Sula'). All of a sudden the whole world was a real interesting place. Everything in it was something I could use or discard. It had shape. The thing is — that's how I live here."

FILE - This Jan. 19, 2013 file photo shows actor Rutger Hauer at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Hauer, who specialized in menacing roles, including a memorable turn as a murderous android in "Blade Runner" opposite Harrison Ford, has died July 19 at his home in the Netherlands. He was 75. (Photo by Victoria Will/Invision/AP, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Dutch film actor Rutger Hauer, who specialized in menacing roles, including a memorable turn as a murderous android in "Blade Runner" opposite Harrison Ford, has died. He was 75.

Hauer's roles included a terrorist in "Nighthawks" with Sylvester Stallone, Cardinal Roark in "Sin City" and playing an evil corporate executive in "Batman Begins." He was in the big-budget 1985 fantasy "Ladyhawke," portrayed a menacing hitchhiker who's picked up by a murderer in the Mojave Desert in "The Hitcher" and won a supporting-actor Golden Globe award in 1988 for "Escape from Sobibor."

Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro in a tweet called Hauer "an intense, deep, genuine and magnetic actor that brought truth, power and beauty to his films." Gene Simmons, the KISS bassist who starred opposite Hauer in "Wanted: Dead or Alive," described his former co-star as "always a gentleman, kind and compassionate."

In "Blade Runner," Hauer played the murderous replicant Roy Batty on a desperate quest to prolong his artificially shortened life in post-apocalyptic, 21st-century Los Angeles.

In his dying, rain-soaked soliloquy, he looked back at his extraordinary existence. "All those moments will be lost in time. Like tears in rain. Time to die," he said.

"It's so much fun to playfully roam into the dark side of the soul and tease people," the actor told The Associated Press in 1987. "If you try to work on human beings' light side, that's harder. What is good is hard. Most people try to be good all their lives. So you have to work harder to make those characters interesting."

Hauer's ruggedly handsome face, blue eyes and strong physique drew the attention of American producers in such international successes as "Turkish Delight," ''Spetters" and "Soldier of Orange." The offers from the United States came as a surprise to Hauer, who faced the same uncertain future experienced by other Dutch film actors.

"We make about 10 films a year, all in Dutch," he recalled. "You act for your own community, basically, which is fine. But you can't live on it. There is also the danger of overexposure; you can't be too greedy." After the world recognition for "Soldier of Orange," a friend suggested Hauer might be able to find work in American films.

Hauer was born in the Netherlands village of Breukelen. His parents were actors but he had little concentration for school and at 15 ran away as a seaman on a freighter. That didn't take, nor did a stint in the army, and his parents decided he was destined to follow the family profession. Rutger enrolled in acting school.

Hauer spent five years with a small troupe bringing theater to rural Holland. He made his film debut in the saucy "Turkish Delight," nominated for an Oscar as best foreign language film of 1973.

Earlier in his career, a Hollywood agent suggested changing his name to something easier for the American public to learn. The actor declined. "If you're good enough, people will remember your name," he explained.

He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Ineke ten Cate, and a daughter, actress Aysha Hauer, from a previous marriage.

This undated image released by Alexandra Hedison shows actor David Hedison, who starred in the original sci-fi classic “The Fly” and appeared in two James Bond films. Hedison died Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Los Angeles. He was 92. (Alexandra Hedison via AP)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — David Hedison, who starred in the original sci-fi classic "The Fly" and appeared in two James Bond films, has died. He was 92.

He died Thursday in Los Angeles with his daughters at his side, a representative for the family, Jennifer Allen, said in an email Monday.

Hedison portrayed Capt. Lee Crane in the long-running sci-fi television series "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" and Spencer Harrison on the daytime series "Another World."

"Even in our deep sadness, we are comforted by the memory of our wonderful father," his daughters Alexandra and Serena said in a statement. "He loved us all dearly and expressed that love every day. He was adored by so many, all of whom benefited from his warm and generous heart. Our dad brought joy and humor wherever he went and did so with great style."

Hedison played scientist Andre Delambre who turned into an insect in the 1958 film "The Fly." He played CIA agent Felix Leiter in Bond films "To Live and Let Die" and "License to Kill."

The Providence, Rhode Island-native began his career under the name Al Hedison. In 1959, he took his middle name David after signing a contract with Twentieth Century Fox.

Hedison's family said the actor entertained friends and family with a positive attitude and "wicked" sense of humor.

FILE - This Nov. 13, 2008 file photo shows actor Arte Johnson at the 15th Annual Lint Roller Party in Los Angeles. Johnson, who won an Emmy for comedy sketch television show “Laugh-In,” died in Los Angeles on Wednesday, July 3, 2019. He was 90. A family representative says Johnson died of heart failure following a three-year battle with bladder and prostate cancers. (AP Photo/Shea Walsh, File)

LOS ANGELES — Actor Arte Johnson, who won an Emmy for comedy sketch work on the television show "Laugh-In," has died early Wednesday in Los Angeles. He was 90.

Johnson died of heart failure following a three-year battle with bladder and prostate cancer, family representative Harlan Boll said. No services have been planned, but his ashes will be spread in a private ceremony.

Johnson became known for his catchphrase "Verrry interesting" on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In." The Michigan native won an Emmy in 1969 and was nominated two more times through his work on the hit show.

One of his characters was Wolfgang, a cigarette-smoking German soldier who thought World War II was still going on.

Johnson's other television appearances include "Bewitched," ''The Partridge Family," ''Lost in Space," ''Murder, She Wrote" and "The Donna Reed Show." He also nabbed roles in films as Dracula's sidekick in "Love at First Bite" and "The President's Analyst" as a federal agent.

Johnson appeared on several game shows such as "The Gong Show," ''The Match Game" and "Wheel of Fortune." He narrated more than 80 audiobooks and did voiceover work for "The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo," ''Justice League Unlimited" and "DuckTales."

In 1954, Johnson began performing in several New York nightclubs. He landed his first job in the industry when he was cast in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," and retired from acting in 2006.

Johnson was a non-Hodgkins lymphoma survivor after being diagnosed then successfully treated in 1997.

FILE - In this March 28, 1990, file photo, Chrysler Corporation Chairman Lee Iacocca sits in a 1990 Dodge Viper sports car as the Chrysler in the 90's six city tour makes a visit to New York. Former Chrysler CEO Iacocca, who became a folk hero for rescuing the company in the '80s, has died, former colleagues said Tuesday, July 2, 2019. He was 94. (AP Photo/Osamu Honda, File)

DETROIT (AP) — Lee Iacocca, the auto executive and master pitchman who put the Mustang in Ford's lineup in the 1960s and became a corporate folk hero when he resurrected Chrysler 20 years later, has died in Bel Air, California. He was 94.

Two former Chrysler executives who worked with him, Bud Liebler, the company's former spokesman, and Bob Lutz, formerly its head of product development, said they were told of the death Tuesday by a close associate of Iacocca's family.

In his 32-year career at Ford and then Chrysler, Iacocca helped launch some of Detroit's best-selling and most significant vehicles, including the minivan, the Chrysler K-cars and the Mustang. He also spoke out against what he considered unfair trade practices by Japanese automakers.

The son of Italian immigrants, Iacocca reached a level of celebrity matched by few auto moguls. During the peak of his popularity in the '80s, he was famous for his TV ads and catchy tagline: "If you can find a better car, buy it!" He wrote two best-selling books and was courted as a presidential candidate.

But he will be best remembered as the blunt-talking, cigar-chomping Chrysler chief who helped engineer a great corporate turnaround.

Liebler, who worked for Iacocca for a decade, said Iacocca had a larger-than-life presence that commanded attention. "He sucked the air out of the room whenever he walked into it," Liebler said. "He always had something to say. He was a leader."

In recent years Iacocca was battling Parkinson's Disease, but Liebler was not sure what caused his death.

He remembers that Iacocca could condemn employees if they did something he didn't like, but a few minutes later it would be like nothing had happened.

"He used to beat me up, sometimes in public," Liebler remembered. When people asked how he could put up with that, Liebler would answer: "He'll get over it."

In 1979, Chrysler was floundering in $5 billion of debt. It had a bloated manufacturing system that was turning out gas-guzzlers that the public didn't want.

When the banks turned him down, Iacocca and the United Auto Workers union helped persuade the government to approve $1.5 billion in loan guarantees that kept the No. 3 domestic automaker afloat.

Liebler said Iacocca is the last of an era of brash, charismatic executives who could produce results. "Lee made money. He went to Washington and made all these crazy promises, then he delivered on them," Liebler said.

Iacocca wrung wage concessions from the union, closed or consolidated 20 plants, laid off thousands of workers and introduced new cars. In TV commercials, he admitted Chrysler's mistakes but insisted the company had changed.

The strategy worked. The bland, basic Dodge Aries and Plymouth Reliant were affordable, fuel-efficient and had room for six. In 1981, they captured 20% of the market for compact cars. In 1983, Chrysler paid back its government loans, with interest, seven years early.

The turnaround and Iacocca's bravado made him a media star. His "Iacocca: An Autobiography," released in 1984, and his "Talking Straight," released in 1988, were best-sellers. He even appeared on "Miami Vice."

A January 1987 Gallup Poll of potential Democratic presidential candidates for 1988 showed Iacocca was preferred by 14%, second only to Colorado Sen. Gary Hart. He continually said no to "draft Iacocca" talk.

Also during that time, he headed the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, presiding over the renovation of the statue, completed in 1986, and the reopening of nearby Ellis Island as a museum of immigration in 1990.

But in the years before his retirement in 1992, Chrysler's earnings and Iacocca's reputation faltered. Following the lead of Ford and General Motors, he undertook a risky diversification into the defense and aviation industries, but it failed to help the bottom line.

Still, he could take credit for such decisions as the 1987 purchase of American Motors Corp. Although the $1.5 billion acquisition was criticized at the time, AMC's Jeep brand has become a gold mine for now Fiat Chrysler Automobiles as demand for SUVs surged.

Iacocca was born Lido Anthony Iacocca in 1924 in Allentown, Pennsylvania. His father, Nicola, became rich in real estate and other businesses, but the family lost nearly everything in the Depression.

After earning a master's degree in mechanical engineering at Princeton University, Iacocca began his career as an engineering trainee with Ford in 1946. But the extrovert quickly became bored and took the unconventional step of switching to sales.

He said a turning point in his career came in 1956, when he was assistant sales manager of the Philadelphia district office ranked last in Ford sales nationwide. Iacocca's devised a financing plan called "56 for 56," under which customers could buy a 1956 Ford for 20% down and payments of $56 a month for three years. The district's sales shot to the top, and Iacocca was quickly promoted to a national marketing job at company headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan.

"We were young and cocky," he recalled in his autobiography. "We saw ourselves as artists, about to produce the finest masterpieces the world had ever seen."

Iacocca's first burst of fame came with the debut of the Mustang in 1964. He had convinced his superiors that Ford needed the affordable, stylish coupe to take advantage of the growing youth market.

He broke from tradition by launching the car in April rather than the fall. Ford invited reporters to a 70-car Mustang rally from New York to Dearborn, which generated huge publicity. The car made the covers of Time and Newsweek the same week.

In 1970, Iacocca was named Ford president and immediately undertook a restructuring to cut costs as the company struggled with foreign competition and rising gas prices. Iacocca's relationship with Chairman Henry Ford II became strained, and in 1978, Ford fired Iacocca. Henry Ford II later described Iacocca as "an extremely intelligent product man, a super salesman" who was "too conceited, too self-centered to be able to see the broad picture," according to interview transcripts published by The Detroit News.

Iacocca got the last laugh. He was strongly courted by Chrysler, and he helped cement its turnaround in the 1980s by introducing the wildly successful Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager minivans.

In July 2005, Iacocca returned to the airwaves as Chrysler's pitchman, including a memorable ad in which he played golf with rapper Snoop Dogg.

Chrysler wasn't faring well. In his 2007 book "Where Have All the Leaders Gone?" Iacocca criticized Chrysler's 1998 sale to the Germany's Daimler AG, which gutted much of Chrysler to cut costs.

As the recession began, sales worsened, and soon Chrysler was asking for a second government bailout. In April 2009, it filed for bankruptcy protection.

Chrysler emerged from bankruptcy protection under the control of Italian automaker Fiat. In a 2009 interview with The Associated Press, he urged Chrysler executives to "take care of our customers. That's the only solid thing you have."

Iacocca was also active in later years in raising money to fight diabetes. His first wife, Mary, died of complications of the disease in 1983 after 27 years of marriage. The couple had two daughters, Kathryn and Lia.

FILE- In this undated file photo heiress and designer Gloria Vanderbilt walks down a New York street. Vanderbilt died on Monday, June 17, 2019, at 95, according to her son, CNN anchor Anderson Cooper. (New York Post via AP, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Gloria Vanderbilt, the intrepid heiress, artist and romantic who began her extraordinary life as the "poor little rich girl" of the Great Depression, survived family tragedy and multiple marriages and reigned during the 1970s and '80s as a designer jeans pioneer, died Monday at the age of 95.

Vanderbilt, the great-great-granddaughter of financier Cornelius Vanderbilt and the mother of CNN newsman Anderson Cooper, who announced her death via a first-person obituary that aired on the network Monday morning.

Cooper confirmed said Vanderbilt died at home with friends and family at her side. She had been suffering from advanced stomach cancer, he noted.

"Gloria Vanderbilt was an extraordinary woman, who loved life, and lived it on her own terms," Cooper said in a statement. "She was a painter, a writer, and designer but also a remarkable mother, wife, and friend. She was 95 years old, but ask anyone close to her, and they'd tell you, she was the youngest person they knew, the coolest, and most modern."

Her life was chronicled in sensational headlines from her childhood through four marriages and three divorces. She married for the first time at 17, causing her aunt to disinherit her. Her husbands included Leopold Stokowski, the celebrated conductor, and Sidney Lumet, the award-winning movie and television director. In 1988, she witnessed the suicide of one of her four sons.

Vanderbilt was a talented painter and collagist who also acted on the stage ("The Time of Your Life" on Broadway) and television ("Playhouse 90," ''Studio One," ''Kraft Theater," ''U.S. Steel Hour"). She was a fabric designer who became an early enthusiast for designer denim. The dark-haired, tall and ultra-thin Vanderbilt partnered with Mohan Murjani, who introduced a $1 million advertising campaign in 1978 that turned the Gloria Vanderbilt brand with its signature white swan label into a sensation.

At its peak in 1980, it was generating over $200 million in sales. And decades later, famous-name designer jeans — dressed up or down — remain a woman's wardrobe staple.

Vanderbilt wrote several books, including the 2004 chronicle of her love life: "It Seemed Important at the Time: A Romance Memoir," which drops such names as Errol Flynn, whom she dated as a teenager; Frank Sinatra, for whom she left Stokowski; Marlon Brando and Howard Hughes.

She claimed her only happy marriage was to author Wyatt Cooper, which ended with his death in 1978 at age 50. Son Anderson Cooper called her memoir "a terrific book; it's like an older 'Sex and the City.'"

"I've had many, many loves," Vanderbilt told The Associated Press in a 2004 interview. "I always feel that something wonderful is going to happen. And it always does."

Noting her father's death when she was a toddler, she said: "If you don't have a father, you don't miss it, because you don't know what it is. It was really only when I married Wyatt Cooper that I understood what it was like to have a father, because he was just an extraordinary father."

In 2016, Vanderbilt and Anderson Cooper appeared together in the HBO documentary "Nothing Left Unsaid."

Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt was born in 1924, a century after her great-great-grandfather started the family fortune, first in steamships, later in railroads. He left around $100 million when he died in 1877 at age 82.

Her father, Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, was 43, a gambler and boozer dying of liver disease when he married Gloria Morgan, 19, in 1923. Their daughter was 1 when Vanderbilt died in 1925, having gone through $25 million in 14 years.

Beneficiary of a $5 million trust fund, Vanderbilt became the "poor little rich girl" in 1934 at age 10 as the object of a custody fight between her globe-trotting mother and matriarchal aunt.

The aunt, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 59, who controlled $78 million and founded the Whitney Museum of American Art, won custody of her niece.

A shocked judge had closed the trial when a maid accused the child's mother of a lesbian affair with a member of the British royal family. The fight was chronicled in the best-selling 1980 book "Little Gloria ... Happy at Last," made into a TV miniseries in 1982 with Angela Lansbury playing Whitney.

After spending the next seven years on her aunt's Long Island estate, Vanderbilt went to Hollywood. She dated celebrities and declared she would marry Hughes. Instead, the 17-year-old wed Hughes' press agent, Pasquale di Cicco, prompting her aunt to cut Gloria out of her will.

Vanderbilt came into her own $5 million trust fund in 1945 at age 21. She also divorced Di Cicco, whom she said had beaten her often, and the next day married the 63-year-old Stokowski. The marriage to the conductor lasted 10 years and produced two sons, Stanislaus and Christopher.

After her marriage broke up, Vanderbilt found herself embroiled in another custody case, this time as the mother. During the closed hearings, Stokowski accused Vanderbilt of spending too much time at parties and too little with the boys. She accused him of tyrannizing his sons and said he really was 85, and not 72 as he claimed.

Justice Edgar Nathan Jr. gave Vanderbilt full-time custody. But he commented that the court had wasted a month on "the resolution of problems which mature, intelligent parents should be able to work out for themselves."

Vanderbilt married Lumet in 1956 and lived with him and her children in a 10-room duplex penthouse on Gracie Square. She divorced Lumet and married Cooper in 1963.

Their elder son, Carter, a Princeton graduate and editor at American Heritage, killed himself in 1988 at age 23, leaping from his mother's 14th floor apartment as she tried to stop him. Police said he had been treated for depression and friends said he was despondent over a break-up with a girlfriend.

After her success in designer jeans, Vanderbilt branched out into other areas, including shoes, scarves, table and bed linens, and china, through her company, Gloria Concepts. In 1988 Vanderbilt joined the designer fragrance market with her signature "Glorious."

By the late 1980s, Vanderbilt sold the name and licenses for the brand name "Gloria Vanderbilt" to Gitano, who transferred it to a group of private investors in 1993. More recently, her stretch jeans have been licensed through Jones Apparel Group Inc., which acquired Gloria Vanderbilt Apparel Corp. in 2002 for $138 million.

Vanderbilt became the target of a swindle in the late 1970s and early '80s when she made her psychiatrist and a lawyer associates in her business affairs. A court held that the two had looted millions from Vanderbilt's bank accounts.

Vanderbilt also made headlines in 1980 when she filed, but later dropped, a discrimination complaint against the posh River House apartments, which had rejected her bid to buy a $1.1 million duplex. She claimed the board was worried that black singer Bobby Short, who appeared with her on TV commercials, might marry her.

In 2009, the 85-year-old Vanderbilt penned a new novel, "Obsession: An Erotic Tale," a graphic tale about an architect's widow who discovers a cache of her husband's letters that reveal his secret sex life.

In an interview with The New York Times, she said she wasn't embarrassed about the explicitness of her new book, saying: "I don't think age has anything to do with what you write about. The only thing that would embarrass me is bad writing, and the only thing that really concerned me was my children. You know how children can be about their parents. But mine are very intelligent and supportive."

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Dr. John, the New Orleans singer and piano player who blended black and white musical styles with a hoodoo-infused stage persona and gravelly bayou drawl, died Thursday, his family said. He was 77.

In a statement released through his publicist, the family said Dr. John, who was born Mac Rebennack, died "toward the break of day" of a heart attack. They did not say where he died or give other details. He had not been seen in public much since late 2017, when he canceled several gigs. He had been resting at his New Orleans area home, publicist Karen Beninato said last year in an interview.

Memorial arrangements were being planned. "The family thanks all whom have shared his unique musical journey, and requests privacy at this time," the statement said.

"Dr. John was a true Louisiana legend," Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said in a statement. "He showed the world Louisiana's rich musical heritage, and his passion for music has left a mark on the industry unlike any other."

Drummer Ringo Starr was among the first musicians to weigh in on Twitter. "God bless Dr. John peace and love to all his family I love the doctor peace and love," the Beatles legend tweeted.

Fellow New Orleans singer Irma Thomas said he was loved around the world. "He was just a mystical person," Thomas told WVUE television when asked what made his music special. "He did what he liked best and was very unique with his style."

His spooky 1968 debut "Gris-Gris" combined rhythm 'n blues with psychedelic rock and startled listeners with its sinister implications of other-worldly magic, employing a piano style both rollicking and haunting. He later had a Top 10 hit with "Right Place, Wrong Time," collaborated with numerous top-tier rockers, won multiple Grammy awards and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

A white man who found a home among black New Orleans musicians, he first entered the music scene when he accompanied his father, who ran a record shop and also fixed the P.A. systems at New Orleans bars.

As a teenager in the 1950s, he played guitar and keyboards in a string of bands and made the legendary studio of Cosimo Matassa his second home, Rebennack said in his 1994 memoir, "Under a Hoodoo Moon." He got into music full-time after dropping out of high school, became acquainted with drugs and petty crime and lived a fast-paced life. His gigs ranged from strip clubs to auditoriums, roadhouses and chicken shacks. The ring finger of Rebennack's left hand was blown off in a shooting incident in 1961 in Jacksonville, Florida.

He blamed Jim Garrison, the JFK conspiracy theorist and a tough-on-crime New Orleans district attorney, for driving him out of his beloved city in the early 1960s. Garrison went after prostitutes, bars and all-night music venues.

The underworld sweep put Rebennack in prison. At that time, he was a respected session musician who had played on classic recordings by R&B mainstays like Professor Longhair and Irma Thomas, but he was also a heroin addict. After his release from federal prison in Fort Worth, Texas, at age 24, Rebennack joined friend and mentor Harold Battiste who had left New Orleans to make music in Los Angeles.

Rebennack, who'd long had a fascination with occult mysticism and voodoo, told Battiste about creating a musical personality out of Dr. John, a male version of Marie Laveau, the voodoo queen.

In his memoir, Rebennack said, he drew inspiration from New Orleans folklore about a root doctor who flourished in the mid-1800s.

But Dr. John was born and Rebennack got his first personal recordings done in what became "Gris-Gris," a 1968 classic of underground American music.

In the years that followed, he played with The Grateful Dead, appeared with The Band in director Martin Scorsese's "The Last Waltz" documentary, jammed on The Rolling Stones' "Exile on Main Street" album and collaborated with countless others — among them Earl King, Van Morrison and James Booker.

This March 28, 1998 file photo shows Leon Redbone performing at the eighth annual Redwood Coast Dixieland Jazz Festival in Eureka, Calif. Redbone, the acclaimed singer and guitarist who performed jazz, ragtime and Tin Pan Alley-styled songs, died Thursday, May 30, 2019, according to a statement released by his family. No details about his death were provided. (Patricia Wilson/The Times-Standard via AP, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Leon Redbone, the blues and jazz artist whose growly voice, Panama hat and cultivated air of mystery made him seem like a character out of the ragtime era or the Depression-era Mississippi Delta, died Thursday. He was 69.

Redbone's career got a boost in the early 1970s when Bob Dylan met him at the Mariposa Folk Festival in Ontario, Canada, and praised his performance. Dylan said that if he ever started a label, he would have signed Redbone.

"Leon interests me," Dylan said in an interview with Rolling Stone in 1974. "I've heard he's anywhere from 25 to 60, I've been (a foot and a half from him) and I can't tell, but you gotta see him. He does old Jimmie Rodgers, then turns around and does a Robert Johnson."

Dylan wasn't the only one who didn't know Redbone's real age since the performer never directly answered questions about his origin or age. Redbone's publicist confirmed he was born in Cyprus on Aug. 26, 1949, but the Thursday statement announcing his death explained that "Leon Redbone crossed the delta for that beautiful shore at the age of 127. He departed our world with his guitar, his trusty companion Rover, and a simple tip of his hat."

"I don't do anything mysterious on purpose. I'm less than forthcoming, but that doesn't necessarily mean I'm mysterious. It just means I'm not inclined to go there," Redbone was quoted saying in the press release that announced his death.

Redbone retired from performing in 2015 because his health had "been a matter of concern for some time," a spokesman for the singer said at the time, and it was "too challenging for him to continue the full range of professional activities."

Most often dressed in a white suit with a string tie, wearing glasses and a panama hat, Redbone performed twice on "Saturday Night Live" in its first season (1975-1976) and was a frequent guest on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson."

He voiced Leon the Snowman in the 2003 Christmas comedy "Elf," starring Will Ferrell, and sang "Baby, It's Cold Outside," a duet with Zooey Deschanel, for the film.

A 16-minute documentary about his life aptly titled "Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone" was released last year.

FILE - In this March 1986, file photo, Boston Red Sox first baseman Bill Buckner poses for a photo. Buckner, a star hitter who became known for making one of the most infamous plays in major league history, has died. He was 69. Buckner's family said in a statement that he died Monday, May 27, 2019, after a long battle with dementia. (AP Photo, File)

Buckner, who made one of the biggest blunders in baseball history when he let Mookie Wilson's trickler roll through his legs in the 1986 World Series, died Monday. He was 69.

Buckner died after a long battle with Lewy body dementia, his family said in a statement. The disease causes Alzheimer's-like symptoms along with movement and other problems.

Buckner made his major league debut as a teenager, played until he was 40 and amassed 2,715 hits in between. Yet for all he accomplished, it was his October error at first base that fans always remembered.

Trying for their first crown since 1918, the Boston Red Sox led the New York Mets 5-3 going into the bottom of the 10th inning in Game 6 at Shea Stadium. The Mets tied it with two outs, then Wilson hit a roller up the first base line that got past a gimpy Buckner, a misplay that let Ray Knight rush home from second base with the winning run.

The Red Sox lost 8-5 in Game 7, and their World Series drought continued until they won the championship in 2004.

In the aftermath of Boston's near-miss, Buckner became a target of fans in New England and beyond, his mistake shown over and over on highlight reels.

"You can look at that Series and point fingers in a whole bunch of different directions," Buckner said a decade ago. "We did the best we could to win there and it just didn't happen and I didn't feel like I deserved" so much blame.

"I was saddened to hear about Bill's death," Wilson said in a statement. "We had developed a friendship that lasted well over 30 years. I felt badly for some of the things he went through. Bill was a great, great baseball player whose legacy should not be defined by one play."

But sure enough, several years ago when he made a guest appearance on the TV show "Curb Your Enthusiasm," the main gag involved star Larry David tossing a ball autographed by Wilson toward Buckner, who lets it get past him and out the window.

A footnote: While Buckner was long criticized for the error, many in baseball contend that even if the ball had been handled cleanly, the speedy Wilson would have beaten it anyway.

At Fenway Park on Monday, video clips of Buckner's 22-year career were shown on the scoreboard before the Red Sox hosted Cleveland. His picture was posted and there was a moment of silence, followed by applause from the crowd.

"I think it was a travesty the way he was last remembered," said 67-year-old Red Sox fan Blaine Macinnis from Wilmington, Massachusetts, in a box seat on the first base side. "It was a great injustice of how he ended it with that last play. It's a shame. That's how life is."

Buckner was released by the Red Sox in the summer of 1987 and went on to play for the Angels and Royals. He returned to Boston for his final season in 1990, playing 22 games.

In 2008, Buckner finally accepted an invitation to throw out the first ball for the home opener at Fenway Park as the Red Sox celebrated winning another title.

Buckner drew loud cheers as he walked from the Green Monster in left field to the mound, and made his ceremonial toss to former teammate Dwight Evans.

"I really had to forgive," he said later that day, "not the fans of Boston per se, but I would have to say, in my heart, I had to forgive the media for what they put me and my family through. So I've done that. I'm over that. And I'm just happy that I just try to think of the positive. The happy things."

"I thought it was kind of a healing moment, it seemed, for a lot of people and for him, I hope," Francona said before Monday's game. "You have to be up here to understand how people take things that happen. I thought that was a really cool moment."

In a statement, Red Sox chairman Tom Werner praised "Billy Buck," saying he "personified toughness and grit, and his determination to play through pain defines him far more than any single play ever could."

Tweeted former Boston teammate Wade Boggs: "OMG such a sad day can't put it in perspective with the only reason why we made it to the World Series in 86."

Buckner lived in Boise, Idaho, after he finished playing. He was the hitting coach for the Chicago Cubs' minor league affiliate in Boise in 2012-13 and owned three car dealerships and several commercial properties in Idaho.

Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts called Buckner a "great ballplayer and beloved member of the Cubs family." Cubs Hall of Famer Ferguson Jenkins praised Buckner for helping his charity foundation.

Hall of Fame manager Tom Lasorda of the Dodgers called Buckner "one of the best competitors I have ever seen."

Buckner made his big league debut with the Dodgers at 19 in 1969 and became a batting champ with the Cubs. He had a career .289 average and totaled over 100 RBIs in three seasons, twice with Boston. Buckner finished with 174 home runs and 1,208 RBIs and he was a fast outfielder, once stealing 31 bases.

An old-school player with a mustache, Buckner was eager to swing — he had 9,397 career at-bats and never struck out 40 times in a season and never walked more than 40 times in a year.

FILE - In this Jan. 16, 1967, file photo, Green Bay Packers quarterback Bart Starr, right, throws a pass during first quarter action during Super Bowl I against the Kansas City Chiefs, at the Los Angeles Coliseum. The Packers beat the Chiefs 35-10. Starr, the Green Bay Packers quarterback and catalyst of Vince Lombardi's powerhouse teams of the 1960s, has died. He was 85. The Packers announced Sunday, May 26, 2019, that Starr had died, citing his family. He had been in failing health since suffering a serious stroke in 2014. (AP Photo/Los Angeles Times)/Los Angeles Times via AP)

Bart Starr was an ordinary quarterback until teaming with Vince Lombardi on the powerhouse Green Bay Packers teams that ruled the 1960s and ushered in the NFL as America's most popular sport.

The quarterback's graceful throws helped turn a run-heavy league into a passing spectacle, yet it's a run for which he's most famous: the sneak that won the famed "Ice Bowl" in 1967.

Starr died Sunday at age 85 in Birmingham, Alabama, the Packers said. He had been in failing health since suffering two strokes and a heart attack in 2014.

Starr is the third of Lombardi's dozen Hall of Famers to die in the past eight months. Fullback Jim Taylor died in October and offensive tackle Forrest Gregg died last month.

"A champion on and off the field, Bart epitomized class and was beloved by generations of Packers fans," Packers President Mark Murphy said in a statement. "A clutch player who led his team to five NFL titles, Bart could still fill Lambeau Field with electricity decades later during his many visits."

The Packers selected Starr out of the University of Alabama with the 200th pick in the 1956 draft. He led Green Bay to six division titles, five NFL championships and wins in the first two Super Bowls.

"Bart Starr was one of the most genuine, sincere people I knew," NFL Commissioner Roger Godell said in a statement. "He personified the values of our league as a football player, a family man, and a tireless philanthropist who cared deeply about helping at-risk kids. Above all, he was a wonderful human being who will be remembered for his kindness and compassion."

Until Brett Favre came along, Starr was known as the best Packer ever. The team retired his No. 15 jersey in 1973, making him just the third player to receive that honor. Four years later, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

After losing the 1960 NFL title game in his first playoff appearance, the Packers never lost another playoff game under Starr, going 9-0, including wins over the Kansas City Chiefs and Oakland Raiders in the first two Super Bowls.

Starr's college career wasn't very noteworthy and it wasn't until Lombardi's arrival in Green Bay in 1959 that Starr, living by his motto "desire and dedication are everything," began to blossom.

Lombardi liked Starr's mechanics, his arm strength and especially his decision-making abilities. Under Lombardi's nurturing, Starr became one of the league's top quarterbacks.

"If you work harder than somebody else, chances are you'll beat him though he has more talent than you," Starr once said. He credited Lombardi for showing him "that by working hard and using my mind, I could overcome my weakness to the point where I could be one of the best."

The gentlemanly quarterback's status as a Packers icon was tested by his struggles as the team's head coach. In nine seasons from 1975-83, he won just 41 percent of his games, going 53-77-3, including 1-1 in the playoffs, part of three decades of futility that followed the glory years.

After football, Starr, became a successful businessman in Birmingham, not far from his hometown of Montgomery, where he was born on Jan. 9, 1934.

Starr was a four-time Pro Bowl selection and two-time All-Pro. He won NFL titles in 1961, '62, '65, '67 and '68. He was the 1966 NFL MVP and was named to the 1960s All-Decade team. He also was named MVP of the first two Super Bowls.

"Bart was a true gentleman, a great player and a great pioneer for the NFL," fellow Hall of Famer John Elway tweeted. "He set a tremendous example for all QBs to emulate."

When Starr retired following the 1971 season, his career completion rate of 57.4 percent was tops in the run-heavy NFL, and his passer rating of 80.5 was second-best ever, behind only Otto Graham.

In the NFL championship on Dec. 31, 1967, Starr knifed into the end zone behind guard Jerry Kramer and center Ken Bowman with 16 seconds left to lift the Packers over the Dallas Cowboys 21-17 in what became known as the "Ice Bowl."

The Packers had spent $80,000 for a heating coil system that was to have kept the field soft and warm, and forecasters said not to worry because the approaching cold front wouldn't arrive until after the game.

"It was 20 degrees the day before," the late Tom Landry once recalled. "It was great. Vince and I were together that night and we talked about how good the conditions were and what a great game it would be."

They were half-right. When the grounds crew rolled up the tarpaulin, a layer of condensation had formed underneath and, with 40 mph wind, the field promptly froze like an ice rink. Packers running back Chuck Mercein would later compare the ground to "jagged concrete."

With a temperature of minus-14 and a wind chill of minus-49, it was the coldest NFL game ever recorded. The wind chill had dipped another 20 degrees by the time the Packers got the ball at their 32 trailing 17-14 with five minutes left.

With one last chance for an aging dynasty to win a fifth NFL title in seven seasons, Starr took the field as linebacker Ray Nitschke hollered, "Don't let me down!"

Starr wouldn't, completing all five of his passes and directing one of the most memorable drives in NFL history.

"We all have a capacity to focus and to concentrate to a unique degree when we're called upon to do it," Starr said on the 30th anniversary of that game. "That's exactly what I did that day. And I think the same was true of the Cowboys. Let's face it, they obviously were not accustomed to something like that and yet they were the team which had surged and come back in the second half and were in a position to win it."

With 1:11 remaining, tackle Bob Skoronski opened a hole and Mercein charged through the middle for 8 yards to the Dallas 3.

Halfback Donny Anderson slipped twice on handoffs, so Starr called timeout, went to the sideline and suggested a sneak because of the poor traction.

"I've never been in a huddle where there was greater composure and where there was a higher level of intensity and concentration," Mercein once told The Associated Press.

Mercein is the one in the famous photograph of the play diving into the end zone behind Starr with his hands held high, as though he's signaling "Touchdown!"

"But what I'm actually doing is I'm showing the officials that I'm not assisting or aiding Bart into the end zone," Mercein said.

Mercein and the rest of his teammates thought he was going to get the handoff on the play. Nobody knew but Starr and Lombardi that it was to be a quarterback sneak. So, Mercein dug in, thinking he was getting the ball, and he got a great takeoff on the frozen field.

"As a matter of fact too good because after a couple of steps I realized I wasn't going to get the ball. But I couldn't really pull up because it was so icy," Mercein said. "So that's why I dive over the play and I have my arms upraised, which appears to everyone in that famous picture that I'm signaling touchdown."

Two weeks later in sunny Miami, the Packers defeated the AFL champion Raiders 33-14 in Lombardi's final game as head coach of the Packers.

Starr replaced Dan Devine as Packers head coach in 1975 and would be replaced himself by former teammate Forrest Gregg in 1984 after failing to lead the franchise to the kind of success he did as a player.

In 1965, Starr and his wife, Cherry, helped co-found Rawhide Boys Ranch in New London, Wisconsin, a facility designed to help at-risk and troubled boys throughout the state.

The couple dealt with tragedy in 1988 when their son Brett died at 24 due to complications from cocaine addiction. They also had another son, Bart Jr.

"While he may always be best known for his success as the Packers quarterback for 16 years, his true legacy will always be the respectful manner in which he treated every person he met, his humble demeanor and his generous spirit," Starr's family said in a statement.

"His love for all of humanity is well known, and his affection toward the residents of Alabama and of Wisconsin filled him with gratitude. He had hoped to make one last trip to Green Bay to watch the Packers this fall, but he shall forever be there in spirit."

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 1989 file photo, actress and animal rights activist Doris Day poses for photos after receiving the Cecil B. DeMille Award she was presented with at the annual Golden Globe Awards ceremony in Los Angeles. Day, whose wholesome screen presence stood for a time of innocence in '60s films, has died, her foundation says. She was 97. The Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed Day died early Monday, May 13, 2019, at her Carmel Valley, California, home. (AP Photo, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Doris Day, the honey-voiced singer and actress whose film dramas, musicals and innocent sex comedies made her a top star in the 1950s and '60s and among the most popular screen actresses in history, has died. She was 97.

The Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed Day died early Monday at her Carmel Valley, California, home. The foundation said she was surrounded by close friends.

"Day had been in excellent physical health for her age, until recently contracting a serious case of pneumonia, resulting in her death," the foundation said in an emailed statement.

With her lilting contralto, wholesome blonde beauty and glowing smile, Day = was a top box office draw and recording artist known for such films as "Pillow Talk" and "That Touch of Mink" and for such songs as "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)" from the Alfred Hitchcock film "The Man Who Knew Too Much."

But over time, she became more than a name above the title: Right down to her cheerful, alliterative stage name, she stood for a time of innocence and G-rated love, a parallel world to her contemporary Marilyn Monroe. The running joke, attributed to both Groucho Marx and actor-composer Oscar Levant, was that they had known Day "before she was a virgin."

In "Pillow Talk," released in 1959 and her first of three films with Rock Hudson, she proudly caught up with what she called "the contemporary in me." Her 1976 tell-all book, "Doris Day: Her Own Story," chronicled her money troubles and three failed marriages, contrasting with the happy publicity of her Hollywood career.

"I have the unfortunate reputation of being Miss Goody Two-Shoes, America's Virgin, and all that, so I'm afraid it's going to shock some people for me to say this, but I staunchly believe no two people should get married until they have lived together," she wrote.

She never won an Academy Award, but Day was given a Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2004, as George W. Bush declared it "a good day for America when Doris Marianne von Kappelhoff of Evanston, Ohio decided to become an entertainer."

In recent years, she spent much of her time advocating for animal rights. Although mostly retired from show business since the 1980s, she still had enough of a following that a 2011 collection of previously unreleased songs, "My Heart," hit the top 10 in the United Kingdom. The same year, she received a lifetime achievement honor from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. Friends and supporters lobbied for years to get her an honorary Oscar.

Born to a music teacher and a housewife, she had dreamed of a dance career, but at age 12, she suffered a crippling accident: a car she was in was hit by a train and her leg was badly broken. Listening to the radio while recuperating, she began singing along with Ella Fitzgerald, "trying to catch the subtle ways she shaded her voice, the casual yet clean way she sang the words."

Day began singing in a Cincinnati radio station, then a local nightclub, then in New York. A bandleader changed her name to Day, after the song "Day after Day," to fit it on a marquee.

A marriage at 17 to trombonist Al Jorden ended when, she said, he beat her when she was eight months pregnant. She gave birth to her son, Terry, in early 1942. Her second marriage also was short-lived. She returned to Les Brown's band after the first marriage broke up.

Her Hollywood career began after she sang at a Hollywood party in 1947. After early stardom as a band singer and a stint at Warner Bros., Day won the best notices of her career with "Love Me or Leave Me," the story of songstress Ruth Etting and her gangster husband-manager. She initially balked at it, but the 1955 film became a box-office and critical success.

She followed with another impressive film, Hitchcock's "The Man Who Knew Too Much," starring her and James Stewart as an innocent couple ensnared in an international assassination plot. She sings "Que Sera, Sera" just as the story reaches its climax and viewers are beside themselves with suspense. The 1958 comedy "Teacher's Pet" paired her with an aging Clark Gable as an idealistic college journalism teacher and her student, an old-school newspaper editor.

But she found her greatest success in slick, stylish sex comedies, beginning with her Oscar-nominated role in "Pillow Talk." She and Hudson were two New Yorkers who shared a telephone party line and initially hated each other.

She followed with "The Thrill of It All," playing a housewife who gains fame as a TV pitchwoman to the chagrin of obstetrician husband James Garner. The nation's theater owners voted her the top moneymaking star in 1960, 1962, 1963 and 1964.

Her first musical hit was the 1945 smash, "Sentimental Journey," when she was barely in her 20s. Among the other songs she made famous were "Everybody Loves a Lover," ''Secret Love," and "It's Magic," a song from "Romance on the High Seas," her first film.

Critic Gary Giddins called her "the coolest and sexiest female singer of slow-ballads in movie history."

"Romance on the High Seas" had been designed for Judy Garland, then Betty Hutton. Both bowed out, and Day, recommended by songwriters Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, won the role. Warner Bros. cashed in on its new star with a series of musicals, including "My Dream Is Yours," ''Tea for Two" and "Lullaby of Broadway." Her dramas included "Young Man with a Horn," with Kirk Douglas and Lauren Bacall, and "Storm Warning," with Ronald Reagan and Ginger Rogers.

Her last film was "With Six You Get Eggroll," a 1968 comedy about a widow and a widower and the problems they have when blending their families.

With movies trending for more explicit sex, she turned to television to recoup her finances. "The Doris Day Show" was a moderate success in its 1966-1973 run on CBS.

Disillusionment grew in the 1960s when she discovered that failed investments by her third husband, Martin Melcher, left her deeply in debt. She eventually won a multimillion-dollar judgment against their lawyer.

She had married Melcher, who worked in her agent's office, in 1951. He became her manager, and her son took his name. In most of the films following "Pillow Talk," Melcher was listed as co-producer. Melcher died in 1969.

In her autobiography, Day recalled her son, Terry Melcher, telling her the $20 million she had earned had vanished and she owed around $450,000, mostly for taxes.

In 1974, Day won a $22.8 million judgment against Jerome B. Rosenthal, her lawyer and business manager, for mishandling of her and Melcher's assets.

Terry Melcher, who died in 2004, became a songwriter and record producer, working with such stars as the Beach Boys. But he was also famous for an aspiring musician he turned down, Charles Manson. When Manson and his followers embarked on their murderous rampage in 1969, they headed for the house once owned by Melcher and instead came upon actress Sharon Tate and some visitors, all of whom were killed.

Day married a fourth time at age 52, to businessman Barry Comden in 1976. She lived in Monterey, California, devoting much of her time to the Doris Day Animal Foundation.

FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2018 file photo, Peggy Lipton arrives at the Stella McCartney Autumn 2018 Presentation in Los Angeles. Lipton, a star of the groundbreaking late 1960s TV show "The Mod Squad" and the 1990s show "Twin Peaks," has died of cancer at age 72. Lipton's daughters Rashida and Kidada Jones say in a statement that Lipton died Saturday, May 11, 2019, surrounded by her family. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Peggy Lipton, a star of the groundbreaking late 1960s TV show "The Mod Squad" and the 1990s show "Twin Peaks," died of cancer Saturday. She was 72.

"We are heartbroken that our beloved mother passed away from cancer today," they said. "She made her journey peacefully with her daughters and nieces by her side. We feel so lucky for every moment we spent with her.  We can't put all of our feelings into words right now but we will say: Peggy was, and will always be our beacon of light, both in this world and beyond.  She will always be a part of us."

Lipton played one of a trio of Los Angeles undercover "hippie cops" on "The Mod Squad," which aired on ABC.

The Los Angeles Times says it was one of pop culture's first efforts to reckon seriously with the counterculture and one of the first TV shows to feature an interracial cast. Lipton was nominated for Emmys and won a Golden Globe in 1971 for her performance. The show addressed issues such as the Vietnam War, drugs and domestic violence.

Lipton married music producer Quincy Jones in 1974, and they had two daughters. The couple divorced in 1989.

"It was very scary," Lipton told The Times in a 1993 interview. "I had a push-pull thing inside me that I wanted to do it.. I had become so insulated in my world as a mother, that I didn't know how to pick up the phone and call anybody to put myself out there."

FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2015, file photo, Peter Mayhew arrives at the world premiere of "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" in Los Angeles. Mayhew, who played the rugged, beloved and furry Wookiee Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” films, has died. Mayhew died at his home in north Texas on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 according to a family statement. He was 74. No cause was given. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Peter Mayhew, the towering actor who donned a huge, furry costume to give life to the rugged-and-beloved character of Chewbacca in the original "Star Wars" trilogy and two other films, has died, his family said Thursday.

Mayhew died at his home in north Texas on Tuesday, according to a family statement. He was 74. No cause was given.

As Chewbacca, known to his friends as Chewie, the 7-foot-3 Mayhew was a fierce warrior with a soft heart, loyal sidekick to Harrison Ford's Han Solo, and co-pilot of the Millennium Falcon.

Mayhew went on to appear as the Wookiee in the 2005 prequel "Revenge of the Sith" and shared the part in 2015's "The Force Awakens" with actor Joonas Suotamo, who took over the role in subsequent films.

"Peter Mayhew was a kind and gentle man, possessed of great dignity and noble character," Ford said in a statement Thursday. "These aspects of his own personality, plus his wit and grace, he brought to Chewbacca. We were partners in film and friends in life for over 30 years and I loved him... My thoughts are with his dear wife Angie and his children. Rest easy, my dear friend."

Mayhew defined the incredibly well-known Wookiee and became a world-famous actor for most of his life without speaking a word or even making a sound — Chewbacca's famous roar was the creation of sound designers.

"He put his heart and soul into the role of Chewbacca and it showed in every frame of the films," the family statement said. "But, to him, the 'Star Wars' family meant so much more to him than a role in a film."

Mark Hamill, who played Luke Skywalker alongside Mayhew, wrote on Twitter that he was "the gentlest of giants — A big man with an even bigger heart who never failed to make me smile & a loyal friend who I loved dearly. I'm grateful for the memories we shared & I'm a better man for just having known him."

Born and raised in England, Mayhew had appeared in just one film and was working as a hospital orderly in London when George Lucas, who shot the first film in England, found him and cast him in 1977's "Star Wars."

Lucas chose quickly when he saw Mayhew, who liked to say all he had to do to land the role was stand up.

"Peter was a wonderful man," Lucas said in a statement Thursday. "He was the closest any human being could be to a Wookiee: big heart, gentle nature ... and I learned to always let him win. He was a good friend and I'm saddened by his passing."

From then on, "Star Wars" would become Mayhew's life. He made constant appearances in the costume in commercials, on TV specials and at public events. The frizzy long hair he had most of his adult life made those who saw him in real life believe he was Chewbacca, along with his stature.

His height, the result of a genetic disorder known as Marfan syndrome, was the source of constant health complications late in his life. He had respiratory problems, his speech grew limited and he often had to use scooters and wheelchairs instead of walking.

His family said his fighting through that to play the role one last time in "The Force Awakens" was a triumph.

Even after he retired, Mayhew served as an adviser to his successor Suotamo, a former Finnish basketball player who told The Associated Press last year that Mayhew put him through "Wookiee boot camp" before he played the role in "Solo."

Mayhew spent much of the last decades of his life in the United States, and he became a U.S. citizen in 2005.

The 200-plus-year-old character whose suit has been compared to an ape, a bear, and Bigfoot, and wore a bandolier with ammunition for his laser rifle, was considered by many to be one of the hokier elements in the original "Star Wars," something out of a more low-budget sci-fi offering.

"Will somebody get this big walking carpet out of my way?!" Carrie Fisher, as Princess Leia, says in the original "Star Wars." It was one of the big laugh lines of the film, as was Ford calling Chewie a "fuzzball" in "The Empire Strikes Back."

But Chewbacca would become as enduring an element of the "Star Wars" galaxy as any other character, his roar — which according to the Atlantic magazine was made up of field recordings of bears, lions, badgers and other animals — as famous as any sound in the universe.

"Chewbacca was an important part of the success of the films we made together," Ford said in his statement.

Mayhew is the third major member of the original cast to die in recent years. Fisher and R2-D2 actor Kenny Baker died in 2016.

Mayhew's family said he was active with various nonprofit groups and established the Peter Mayhew Foundation, which is devoted to alleviating disease, pain, suffering and the financial toll from traumatic events. The family asked that in lieu of flowers, friends and fans donate to the foundation.

Mayhew is survived by his wife, Angie, and three children. A private service will be held June 29, followed by a public memorial in early December at a Los Angeles "Star Wars" convention.

FILE - This June 13, 1986 file photo shows actress Victoria Principal, left, and actor Ken Kercheval, co-stars of the popular TV-show "Dallas." Kercheval, who played Cliff Barnes on the hit TV series “Dallas” has died at age 83. Agent Jeff Fisher said Kercheval died Easter Sunday in Clinton, Ind. (AP Photo/Craig Mathew, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ken Kercheval, who played perennial punching bag Cliff Barnes to Larry Hagman's scheming oil baron J.R. Ewing on the hit TV series "Dallas," has died. He was 83.

Kercheval died Sunday in the city of Clinton in his native Indiana, said Jeff Fisher, his agent. The cause of death was being kept private by family, Fisher said Wednesday.

He was in "Dallas" for its full run, from 1978 to 1991, and returned as oilman Cliff opposite Hagman for a revival of the prime-time drama that aired from 2012-14.

He expressed fondness for his beleaguered character, also part of two TV '90s movies, in a 2012 interview with a "Dallas" fan website, The Dallas Decoder.

Cliff was a nice guy, but with brother-in-law J.R.'s constant battering he had to defend himself, Kercheval said. "If I did something that wasn't quite right, it's because I had to," he added.

Kercheval was born in Wolcottville, Indiana, and raised in Clinton by his father, a physician, and his mother, a nurse. He studied at the University of Indiana and the University of the Pacific, according to profiles.

His early roles were on stage, with Broadway performances in musicals including "The Young Abe Lincoln" in 1961 and "The Apple Tree" and "Cabaret" in the late '60s.

Kercheval's big-screen credits included "Pretty Poison" (1968), "The Seven-Ups" in 1973 and "Network" in 1976.

He made frequent guest appearances on TV series, stretching from "Naked City" and "The Defenders" in the 1960s to "ER" and "Diagnosis Murder" in the 1990s and 2000s. His last online credit is for the film "Surviving in L.A."

In a first-person piece for People magazine in 1994, Kercheval detailed his arduous treatment for lung cancer and advocated that others quit smoking, as he was "99 percent" successful in doing.

FILE - In this Aug. 30, 1992, file photo, Mary Tyler Moore, right, is joined by former "Mary Tyler Moore Show" co-star Georgia Engel, left, who played Georgette, at New York's Russian Tea Room, as the two reunited during an Emmy Awards screening party Moore hosted at the famous New York restaurant. Engel died Friday, April 12, 2019, in Princeton, N.J., at age 70. (AP Photo/Malcolm Clarke, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Georgia Engel, who played the charmingly innocent, small-voiced Georgette on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and amassed a string of other TV and stage credits, has died. She was 70.

Engel died Friday in Princeton, New Jersey, said her friend and executor, John Quilty. The cause of death was unknown because she was a Christian Scientist and didn't see doctors, Quilty said Monday.

"I know the world will be sad and sorry. She touched so many people," said her agent, Jacqueline Stander.

Engel was best known for her role as Georgette on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," the character who was improbably destined to marry pompous anchorman Ted Baxter, played by Ted Knight.

Engel also had recurring roles on "Everybody Loves Raymond" and "Hot in Cleveland." She was a five-time Emmy nominee, receiving two nods for the late Moore's show and three for "Everybody Loves Raymond."

She was "the sweetest, kindest, dearest woman. And crazy talented. I will miss her," Valerie Bertinelli, who starred in "Hot in Cleveland," said in a Twitter post.

Georgia Bright Engel was born in July 1948 in Washington, D.C., to parents Benjamin, a Coast Guard officer, and Ruth Engel. She studied theater at the University of Hawaii.

Her prolific career included guest appearances on a variety of series, including "The Love Boat," ''Fantasy Island," ''Coach" and "Two and a Half Men." Her "Hot in Cleveland" role reunited her with Betty White, her co-star in "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" (1972-77) and "The Betty White Show" (1977-78).

Engel appeared on Broadway in plays and musicals including "Hello, Dolly!", "The Boys from Syracuse" and, most recently, "The Drowsey Chaperone" in 2006-07. She starred in an off-Broadway production of "Uncle Vanya" in 2012.

Engel could be as upbeat as the fictional Georgette, as was demonstrated during a panel discussion last year promoting the 2018 PBS special, "Betty White: First Lady of Television."

She recalled that a possible "Everybody Loves Raymond" spinoff set to include her and Fred Willard never come to fruition, which she called a great disappointment.

"But if that hadn't happened," she said, "I wouldn't have been able to star" in writer-actor Bob Martin's "Drowsey Chaperone," which led to her custom-tailored role in Martin's "Half Time." The musical, about older adults who school themselves in hip hop to perform in half-time shows, was staged in New Jersey last year.

Her real-life voice was as sweet as the one familiar from her screen roles. "What you see is what you get. That's not a character voice — that's our girl," a smiling White said in a 2012 interview with Engel, calling her a "pure gold" friend and colleague.

Engel's final credited television appearance came last year in the Netflix series "One Day at a Time."

Funeral services for Engel, whose survivors include her sisters Robin Engel and Penny Lusk, will be private, Quilty said.

FILE - In this March 29, 2018, file photo, rapper Nipsey Hussle watches an NBA basketball game between the Golden State Warriors and the Milwaukee Bucks in Oakland, Calif. Grammy-nominated and widely respected West Coast rapper Nipsey Hussle has been shot and killed outside his Los Angeles clothing store, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Sunday, March 31, 2019. He was 33. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rapper Nipsey Hussle was fatally shot outside the clothing store he founded to help rebuild his troubled South Los Angeles neighborhood, police said, cutting short a career that earned him a Grammy nomination this year for his major-label debut. He was 33.

Police said Hussle was one of three men shot Sunday outside Marathon Clothing, his store in South Los Angeles; the other two were in stable condition. A large crowd gathered outside the store as night fell. Detectives were canvassing the area for witnesses and looking to see if any surveillance video captured the shooting, police Lt. Chris Ramirez said.

"Our hearts are with the loved ones of Nipsey Hussle and everyone touched by this awful tragedy. L.A. is hurt deeply each time a young life is lost to senseless gun violence," Garcetti tweeted. "My Crisis Response Team is assisting the families coping with shock and grief."

Hussle, who had two children and was engaged to actress Lauren London, was an Eritrean-American whose real name was Ermias Asghedom.

"This doesn't make any sense! My spirit is shaken by this!," Rihanna wrote while posting photos of Hussle with his daughter and another with his fiance. "Dear God may His spirit Rest In Peace and May You grant divine comfort to all his loved ones! I'm so sorry this happened to you @nipseyhussle."

Hussle was born on Aug. 15, 1985, in the same Crenshaw neighborhood where he died, and where he had been working to provide youths with alternatives to the hustling he did when he was younger.

Los Angeles Police Commissioner Steve Soboroff tweeted that he and Police Chief Michel Moore had agreed with Hussle to meet with him and representatives of Roc Nation, Jay-Z's entertainment agency and production company, on Monday to "talk about ways he could help stop gang violence and help us help kids."

Hussle explained where he was coming from in a Los Angeles Times interview last year: "In our culture, there's a narrative that says, 'Follow the athletes, follow the entertainers,'" he said. "And that's cool, but there should be something that says, 'Follow Elon Musk, follow (Mark) Zuckerberg.'

Hussle said his first passion was music but getting resources was tough after leaving his mother's house at 14 to live with his grandmother. Hussle said he got involved in street life as he tried to support himself, and he joined the gang Rollin 60's Neighborhood Crips as a teenager.

"The culture of my area is the gang culture," he explained in a 2014 interview with VladTV. "So by being outside, being involved with hustling, being in the hood, doing things to try to get money, being young, you know riding your bike through the hood, getting shot at, your loved ones and homies that's your age getting killed, getting shot at ... it's like, we were just raised like if you with me and something goes now, I'm in it."

Music eventually happened for Hussle. He released a number of successful mixtapes that he sold out of the trunk of his car, helping him create a buzz and gain respect from rap purists and his peers. In 2010 he placed on hip-hop magazine XXL's "Freshman Class of 2010" — a coveted list for up-and-coming hip-hop acts — alongside J. Cole Big Sean, Wiz Khalifa, Jay Rock and others.

The proud West Coast rapper continued to build more hype for himself, scoring big when Jay-Z bought 100 copies of his 2013 mixtape "Crenshaw" for $100 each, and sent him a $10,000 check.

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Hussle and rapper YG released the protest song "FDT," short for "(Expletive) Donald Trump." He later hit a new peak with "Victory Lap," his critically acclaimed major-label debut album on Atlantic Records that made several best-of lists last year, from Billboard magazine to Complex. The album debuted at No. 4 on Billboard's 200 albums charts and featured collaborations with Kendrick Lamar, Diddy, CeeLo Green and more.

At this year's Grammy Awards, "Victory Lap" was one of five nominees for best rap album in a year that hip-hop dominated the pop charts and streaming services and a number of top stars released projects, including Drake, Eminem and Kanye West. Cardi B's "Invasion of Privacy" won the honor last month, while the other nominees were Travis Scott, Pusha T and Mac Miller.

"It's my debut album so for my first one (to be nominated) out the gate, it's like, it was overwhelming a little bit. It was ... inspiring, humbling," he said in an interview with the Recording Academy on the red carpet of the 2019 Grammys, which he attended with this daughter.

Many celebrities were mourning his death on social media. NBA star Steph Curry tweeted, "God please cover and restore @NipseyHussle right now!!!"

Snoop Dogg posted a video of himself and Hussle together on Instagram, and posted a second clip sending prayers to the rapper's family.

"Prayers out to the whole family man. This (stuff has) got to stop man," he said in the second video.

Rapper Nas mourned Hussle's death on Instagram and wrote, "It's dangerous to be an MC. Dangerous to be a b-ball player. It's dangerous to have money. Dangerous To Be A Black Man."

"So much hatred. We live like our brothers and sisters in third world countries live. Right in America," Nas continued. "Its so deep rooted. It's not a easy fix. Hard to fix anything when kids are still living in poverty. I ain't shutting up though, Nipsey is a True voice. He will never be silenced."

Outside of music, Hussle said he wanted to provide hope and motivation to those who grew up in Crenshaw like him, and pay it forward. Forbes magazine reported in February that with business partner Dave Gross, the rapper had purchased the Crenshaw plaza where his Marathon Clothing store is located, and had plans to knock it down and "rebuild it as a six-story residential building atop a commercial plaza where a revamped Marathon store will be the anchor tenant."

"Watching Nipsey inspired me to invest and own in our communities," Emmy-nominated actress Issa Rae, also from Los Angeles, wrote on Twitter.

TV commentator Van Jones also tweeted, writing: "AWFUL. This brother was JUST getting started. He'd finally figured out how to use celebrity to build real wealth and opportunity in the hood. AND HE WAS DOING IT — FOR ALL OF US!!!"

FILE - In this June 20, 2012 file photo, former Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind., the author of Title IX in Congress, speaks during a forum in the South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington in a gathering to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Title IX. Bayh, who championed the federal law banning discrimination against women in college admissions and sports, has died. He was 91. Bayh died early Thursday, March 14, 2019, surrounded by his family at his home in Easton, Md., according to a statement released by his family. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Former U.S. Sen. Birch Bayh, who championed the federal law banning discrimination against women in college admissions and sports, died at his home Thursday at age 91.

Bayh was surrounded by family at his home in Easton, Maryland, when he died shortly after midnight from pneumonia, his family said in a statement. His son, Evan, followed him into politics and became Indiana's governor and a senator.

The liberal Democrat had a back-slapping, humorous campaigning style that helped him win three narrow elections to the Senate starting in 1962, at a time when Republicans won Indiana in four of the five presidential elections. Bayh's hold on the seat ended with a loss to Dan Quayle during the 1980 Ronald Reagan-led Republican landslide.

Bayh was the lead sponsor of the landmark 1972 law prohibiting gender discrimination in education — known as Title IX for its section in the Higher Education Act. The law's passage came at a time when women earned fewer than 10 percent of all medical and law degrees and fewer than 300,000 high school girls — one in 27 — played sports.

Bayh said the law was aimed at giving women a better shot at higher-paying jobs. He continued speaking in support of Title IX's enforcement for years after leaving Congress.

"It was clear that the greatest danger or damage being done to women was the inequality of higher education," Bayh said in a 2012 interview. "If you give a person an education, whether it's a boy or girl, young woman or young man, they will have the tools necessary to make a life for families and themselves."

Now, women make up more than half of those receiving bachelor's and graduate degrees, and more than 3 million high school girls — one in two — play sports.

Tennis great Billie Jean King, who worked with Bayh on women's rights issues, released a statement with his family Thursday saying the former senator was "one of the most important Americans of the 20th century."

"You simply cannot look at the evolution of equality in our nation without acknowledging the contributions and the commitment Senator Bayh made to securing equal rights and opportunities for every American," she said.

Bayh used his position as head of the Senate's constitutional subcommittee to craft the 25th Amendment on presidential succession and the 26th Amendment setting the national voting age at 18.

The issue of presidential succession was fresh when Congress approved the amendment in 1967. The vice presidency had been vacant for more than a year after President John F. Kennedy's assassination because there was no provision for filling the office between elections.

The amendment led to the presidency of Gerald Ford less than a decade later when Ford first succeeded Spiro Agnew as vice president and then took over the White House after President Richard Nixon's resignation during the Watergate scandal.

Bayh's push to lower the national voting age from 21 to 18 came amid protests over the Vietnam War and objections that Americans dying on battlefields were unable to vote in all states. The amendment won ratification from the states in 1971.

Bayh also was a leading sponsor of the Equal Rights Amendment, which would have barred discrimination on the basis of gender. It passed Congress but failed to win approval from two-thirds of the states by its 1982 deadline.

Bayh had begun preparing to make a run for the 1972 Democratic presidential nomination when his wife, Marvella, was diagnosed with breast cancer. He dropped that campaign but entered the 1976 presidential campaign, finishing second to Jimmy Carter in the opening Iowa caucuses but then faring poorly in later primaries.

Marvella Bayh gained attention by speaking and making television appearances around the country promoting cancer detection and encouraging research. But her cancer later returned, and she died in April 1979 at age 46 — shortly before her memoir recounting her health fight was published.

Bayh sought a fourth Senate term the following year — with 24-year-old son Evan as campaign manager — but lost to Quayle, then a two-term congressman.

Born Jan. 22, 1928, in Terre Haute, Indiana, Birch Evans Bayh Jr. moved to his maternal grandparents' farm at the nearby community of Shirkieville after his mother's 1940 death and his father's entry into World War II military service.

He graduated from Purdue University's School of Agriculture after spending two years in the Army and met his future wife during a 1951 National Farm Bureau speaking contest in Chicago, which she won as an entrant from Oklahoma. They soon married and moved to the Shirkieville farm.

Bayh won his first election to the state Legislature in 1954; his son Evan was born the following year. Bayh rose quickly in politics, becoming the Indiana House speaker in 1959 at the age of 30. He earned a law degree from Indiana University, completing law school while serving in the Legislature.

Bayh entered the 1962 Senate race, taking on three-term Republican Sen. Homer Capehart. Bayh boosted his name recognition — and correct pronunciation — around the state with a catchy campaign song opening with the lines "Hey look him over, he's my kind of guy. His first name is Birch, his last name is Bayh."

Bayh was 34 when elected to the Senate and soon became friends with the only senator younger than him — Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy. Bayh and his wife were flying with Kennedy when their small plane crashed near Springfield, Mass., in June 1964. The pilot and a legislative aide were killed, but Bayh pulled Kennedy, who suffered a broken back and other serious injuries, from the wreckage.

After leaving the Senate, Bayh worked as a lawyer and lobbyist in Washington. He remarried in 1982, and he and wife Katherine Helpin had a son, Christopher, who is now a lawyer in Washington.

Bayh largely stayed in the background of Indiana politics as his older son, Evan, was elected to the first of his two terms as governor in 1988. The younger Bayh built a more moderate image than his father, ending his eight years as governor with a high approval rating and then winning his first of two elections to the Senate in 1998. He didn't seek a third term in 2010, saying the Senate had become too partisan.

The elder Bayh seemed to revel in the change brought about from the Title IX law, describing it as the most important legal step for equality since the right of women to vote was guaranteed by the 19th Amendment in 1920.

"There was a soccer field I used to jog around," he said. "One day, all of a sudden, I realized that half of the players were little girls and half of them were little boys. I realized then that that was, in part, because of Title IX."

FILE - This September 1986 file photo shows actor Jan-Michael Vincent. Vincent, known for starring in the television series "Airwolf," died Feb. 10, 2019. He was 73. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

Actor Jan-Michael Vincent, the "Airwolf" television star whose sleek good looks belied a troubled personal life, has died. He was 73.

A death certificate shows that Vincent died of cardiac arrest on Feb. 10, 2019, in an Asheville, North Carolina, hospital. The certificate signed by a doctor says he died of natural causes and no autopsy was performed.

It wasn't clear why it took several weeks for news of the death to surface before it was first reported Friday by TMZ. Messages left at phone listings for Vincent and his wife weren't immediately returned Friday.

Born in 1945 in Denver, Colorado, Vincent starred in such films as 1972's "The Mechanic" and 1978's "Hooper," in which he played a stuntman opposite Burt Reynolds. Off-screen, his handsomeness earned him a spot on a cosmetic surgeon's "Ten Best Noses" list in the late 1970s.

He also starred in the 1983 television mini-series "Winds of War" as the love interest of a character played by Ali MacGraw, "piling up enormous ratings," according to a contemporary Associated Press account. He earned a Golden Globe nomination.

In a 1984 AP interview, Vincent described his passion for being on the water. He said he spent three months after wrapping up "Winds of War" sailing the Caribbean. He also said he was a longtime surfer.

"I was a traveling surfer for years. ... I've been all over the world surfing," he said. "I'll be 40 in July and I still like to surf."

Perhaps his best-known role was in the television action-adventure series "Airwolf," which lasted for several seasons after launching in 1984. Vincent played pilot Stringfellow Hawke, a rugged pilot who could pull off aerobatic crime-fighting maneuvers in an advanced helicopter — but also play the cello.

"The character is stiff," he says, "but as we've gone along we've been able to loosen him some. Now you'll sometimes see him crack a smile and say something funny. Even Clint Eastwood is mellowing, although I'll never be Burt Reynolds."

However, his surfer-like demeanor was overshadowed at times by his troubled personal life. He pleaded guilty in 1997 to a drunken driving accident that left him with a broken neck and was sentenced to a rehab program. He was also charged in 1980s barroom brawls, receiving probation in one and an acquittal in another. In a separate case, he was acquitted in 1986 of hitting a woman.

He was sentenced to 60 days in jail in 2000 in Orange County, California, after he admitted to violating his probation by appearing drunk in public and assaulting his then-girlfriend.

This image provided by the WWE shows professional wrestler King Kong Bundy. Promoter and longtime friend David Herro says Bundy, whose real name was Christopher Pallies, died on Monday, March 4, 2019. The 6-foot-4 (1.93 meters), 458-pound (208-kilogram) wrestler made his World Wrestling Federation debut in 1981 and was best known for facing Hulk Hogan in 1986 in a steel cage match at WrestleMania 2. (WWE via AP)

Promoter and longtime friend David Herro says Bundy died Monday. Herro posted on Facebook : "Today we lost a Legend and a man I consider family." The cause of death and other details were not disclosed.

Bundy, whose real name was Christopher Pallies, was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The 6-foot-4 (1.93 meters), 458-pound (208-kilogram) wrestler made his World Wrestling Federation debut in 1981.

He was best known for facing Hulk Hogan in 1986 in a steel cage match at WrestleMania 2, which Hogan won. WWE said he was one of the "greatest ... big men to lace up a set of boots."

FILE - In this file photo dated Monday, Aug. 3, 2009, British musician Keith Flint of Prodigy talks to the media after winning the best single for 'Omen' at the Kerrang Awards 2009, at the Brewery in London. The Progidy front man, 49-year old Flint is reported to have died at his home in London, according to a statement released by the band Monday March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Joel Ryan, FILE)

LONDON (AP) — Keith Flint, lead singer of dance-electronic band The Prodigy, has been found dead at his home near London. He was 49.

Flint was the stage persona of the band, whose hits "Firestarter" and "Breathe" fused techno, breakbeat and acid house music. The band sold 30 million records, taking rave music from an insular community of party-goers and bringing it to an international audience.

The energetic frontman was also known for his distinctive look: black eyeliner and hair spiked into two horns.

"A true pioneer, innovator and legend," the band said in a statement confirming his death. "He will be forever missed."

Born Keith Charles Flint on Sept. 17, 1969 in east London, he moved to Braintree, Essex as a child, where he met co-founder Liam Howlett at a nightclub.

The band was known as much for their overt anti-establishment stance as much for their music. They were vocal critics of the U.K.'s Criminal Justice And Public Order Act 1994, which banned the raves popularized in the late-1980s during the so-called Second Summer of Love.

This image provided by one of his sons via Sarah Mack Photo shows actor Nathaniel Taylor, who played the role of Rollo Dawson in the hit 1970s sitcom "Sanford and Son." Taylor died Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, in Los Angeles, at the age of 80. (Sarah Mack Photo via AP)

Nathaniel Taylor, the actor best known as Rollo Lawson, the street-smart best friend of the son on the 1970s sitcom "Sanford and Son," has died.

Taylor died Wednesday at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles after a heart attack, his son Kaedi Taylor told The Associated Press Saturday. The elder Taylor was 80.

Taylor's character, Rollo, was the sidekick to Lamont Sanford, played by actor Demond Wilson, and often drew the skepticism of TV patriarch Fred Sanford, who thought Rollo was a bad influence on Lamont because he'd spent time in jail. The fast-talking but good-hearted Rollo dressed in colorful suits and hats and called Fred — played by actor and comedian Redd Foxx — "Pops."

Taylor went on to act in other shows and movies, later opening a performing arts studio for young actors. But his son said Taylor never tired of people recognizing him as Rollo.

"It was a time and an era — just to be on TV as a black man, it was an honor," said Kaedi Taylor, who works in the television and film industry behind the scenes. "It was an honor for people to remember him."

Nathaniel Taylor also played roles on shows such as "The Redd Foxx Show," ''Police Story" and "What's Happening" and Blaxpoitation films such as "Dynamite" and "Trouble Man." He reprised his role as Rollo in the 1980s spinoff "Sanford."

Hip-hop music promoter Alonzo "Lonzo" Williams, one of Taylor's longtime friends, said the actor was a mentor to many. "He was always there with a wise word and a kind word and a joke to put a little icing on it," Williams said.

FILE - In this May 26, 2006, file photo, Katherine Helmond arrives for the premiere of the Disney/Pixar animated film "Cars" at Lowe's Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. Helmond, best known as the grandmother who was hot for housekeeper Tony Danza on “Who’s The Boss,” died last Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019, of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at her home in Los Angeles, her talent agency APA announced Friday, March 1, 2019. She was 89. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actress Katherine Helmond, an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe-winning actress who played two very different matriarchs on the ABC sitcoms "Who's the Boss?" and "Soap," has died, her talent agency said Friday. She was 89.

Helmond died of complications from Alzheimer's disease last Saturday at her home in Los Angeles, talent agency APA said in a statement.

A native of Galveston, Texas, Helmond's credits date back to the 1950s and she worked steadily in small roles through the decades. But her real fame, and all seven of her Emmy nominations, didn't start arriving until she was nearly 50.

She was probably best known for playing Mona Robinson, Judith Light's mother on "Who's the Boss?," which also starred Tony Danza and a young Alyssa Milano.

"My beautiful, kind, funny, gracious, compassionate, rock," Milano mourned on Twitter. "You were an instrumental part of my life. You taught me to hold my head above the marsh! You taught me to do anything for a laugh! What an example you were!"

On the show, Light was an uptight single mother who hired the 1980s heartthrob Danza to be her live-in housekeeper, and Helmond was her foil, a lover of nightlife, pursuer of men and flaunter of sexuality who would have been at home on "The Golden Girls," which ran during the same years.

"Katherine Helmond was a remarkable human being and an extraordinary artist; generous, gracious, charming and profoundly funny," Light said in a statement. "She taught me so much about life and inspired me indelibly by watching her work. Katherine was a gift to our business and to the world."

An only child, raised by her mother and grandmother, who began acting while a girl in Catholic school, Helmond began her professional career in theater and returned to it often, earning a Tony Award nomination in 1973 for her Broadway role in Eugene O'Neill's "The Great God Brown."

She was a favorite of director Terry Gilliam, who put her in his films "Brazil," ''Time Bandits," and "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas."

In "Brazil," a dystopian comedy from 1985, she played a surgery-addicted woman whose elastic face became one of the most memorable images from the cult film.

Her major break came with "Soap," a parody of soap operas that aired from 1977 to 1981. She played wealthy matriarch Jessica Tate, one of two main characters on the show, which co-starred Robert Guillaume and was also a breakthrough for Billy Crystal, who played her nephew.

She was nominated for Emmys for all four seasons of the show and won a best actress in a comedy Golden Globe in 1981.

Helmond kept working into her 80s doing mostly voice work, most notably as the Model T Lizzie in the Pixar "Cars" films.

She had a recurring role on "Everybody Loves Raymond" from 1996 to 2004 as the title character's mother-in-law.

"Katherine Helmond was such a class act and incredibly down to earth," tweeted actress Patricia Heaton, who co-starred with Ray Romano on the show. "She was terrific as my mother on 'Everybody Loves Raymond' and I looked up to her as a role model."

She is survived by her husband of 57 years, David Christian, her half-sister, Alice Parry, and many nieces and nephews, her agency's statement said.

Peter Tork of the pop group the Monkees is shown at a press conference at the Warwick Hotel in New York on July 6, 1967. (AP Photo/Ray Howard)

Peter Tork, a musician who became a sensation as a member of the Monkees, the made-for-TV pop group that soared to fame in the 1960s, has died at 77.

FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2001 file photo, actor Albert Finney, poses for a photo. British Actor Albert Finney, the Academy Award-nominated star of films from "Tom Jones" to "Skyfall" has died at the age of 82 it was reported on Friday, Feb. 8, 2019. (William Conran/PA via AP, FIle)

LONDON (AP) — British actor Albert Finney, the Academy Award-nominated star of films from "Tom Jones" to "Skyfall," has died at the age of 82.

Finney's family said Friday that he "passed away peacefully after a short illness with those closest to him by his side."

Finney was a rare star who managed to avoid the Hollywood limelight for more than five decades after bursting to international fame in 1963 in the title role of "Tom Jones."

The film gained him the first of five Oscar nominations. Others followed for "Murder on the Orient Express," ''The Dresser," ''Under the Volcano" and "Erin Brockovich."

In later years he brought authority to action movies, including the James Bond thriller "Skyfall" and two of the Bourne films.

Displaying the versatility of a virtuoso, Finney portrayed Winston Churchill, Pope John Paul II, a southern American lawyer, an Irish gangster and an 18th-century rogue, among dozens of other roles over the years. There was no "Albert Finney"-type character that he returned to again and again.

In one of his final roles, as the gruff Scotsman Kincade in "Skyfall," he shared significant screen time with Daniel Craig as Bond and Judi Dench as M, turning the film's final scenes into a master class of character acting.

Although Finney rarely discussed his personal life, he told the Manchester Evening News in 2012 that he had been treated for kidney cancer for five years, undergoing surgery and chemotherapy.

He also explained why he had not attended the Academy Awards in Los Angeles even when he was nominated for the film world's top prize.

The son of a bookmaker, Finney was born May 9, 1936, and grew up in northern England on the outskirts of Manchester. He took to the stage at an early age, doing a number of school plays and — despite his lack of connections and his working-class roots — earning a place at London's prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts.

He credited the headmaster of his local school, Eric Simms, for recommending that he attend the renowned drama school.

Finney made his first professional turn at 19 and appeared in several TV movies, including "She Stoops to Conquer" in 1956 and "The Claverdon Road Job" the following year.

Soon some critics were hailing him as "the next Laurence Olivier" — a commanding presence who would light up the British stage. Britain's pre-eminent theater critic, Kenneth Tynan, called the young Finney a "smoldering young Spencer Tracy" and warned established star Richard Burton about his prowess. In London, Finney excelled both in Shakespeare's plays and in more contemporary offerings.

Still, the young man seemed determine not to pursue conventional Hollywood stardom. After an extensive screen test, he turned down the chance to play the title role in director David Lean's epic "Lawrence of Arabia," clearing the way for fellow RADA graduate Peter O'Toole to take what became a career-defining role.

But stardom came to Finney anyway in "Tom Jones" where he won over audiences worldwide with his good-natured, funny and sensual portrayal of an 18th-century English rogue.

That was the role that introduced Finney to American audiences, and few would forget the lusty, blue-eyed leading man who helped the film win a Best Picture Oscar. Finney also earned his first Best Actor nomination for his efforts and the smash hit turned him into a Hollywood leading man.

"No social significance for once," he said. "No contemporary problems to lay bare. Just a lot of colorful, sexy fun."

Finney had the good fortune to receive a healthy percentage of the profits from the surprise hit, giving him financial security while he was still in his 20s.

"This is a man from very humble origins who became rich when he was very young," said Quentin Falk, author of an unauthorized biography of Finney. "It brought him a lot of side benefits. He's a man who likes to live as well as to act. He enjoys his fine wine and cigars. He's his own man, I find that rather admirable."

The actor maintained a healthy skepticism about the British establishment and even turned down a knighthood when it was offered, declining to become Sir Albert.  Finney once said he did not believe in such honors.

"Maybe people in America think being a 'Sir' is a big deal," he said. "But I think we should all be misters together. I think the 'Sir' thing slightly perpetuates one of our diseases in England, which is snobbery. And it also helps keep us 'quaint,' which I'm not a great fan of."

Instead of cashing in by taking lucrative film roles after "Tom Jones," Finney took a long sabbatical, traveling slowly through the United States, Mexico and the Pacific islands, then returned to the London stage to act in Shakespeare productions and other plays. He won wide acclaim and many awards before returning to film in 1967 to co-star with Audrey Hepburn in "Two for the Road."

This was to be a familiar pattern, with Finney alternating between film work and stage productions in London and New York.

Finney tackled Charles Dickens in "Scrooge" in 1970, then played Agatha Christie's super-sleuth Hercule Poirot in "Murder on the Orient Express" — earning his second Best Actor nomination— and even played a werewolf hunter in the cult film "Wolfen" in 1981.

He earned more Best Actor Oscar nominations for his roles in the searing marital drama "Shoot the Moon" in 1982, co-starring with Diane Keaton, and "The Dresser" in 1983. He was nominated again in 1984 for his role as a self-destructive alcoholic in director John Huston's "Under the Volcano."

Even during this extraordinary run of great roles, and his critically acclaimed television portrayal of the pope, Finney's life was not chronicled in People Weekly or other magazines, although the British press was fascinated with his marriage to the sultry French film star Anouk Aimee.

He played in a series of smaller, independent films for a number of years before returning to prominence in 2000 as a southern lawyer in the film "Erin Brockovich," which starred Julia Roberts. The film helped introduce Finney to a new generation of moviegoers, and the chemistry between the aging lawyer and his young, aggressive assistant earned him yet another Oscar nomination, this time for Best Supporting Actor.

His work also helped propel Roberts to her first Best Actress Oscar. Still, Finney declined to attend the Academy Awards ceremony — possibly damaging his chances at future wins by snubbing Hollywood's elite.

He went on to star in director Tim Burton's "Big Fish" and portrayed Britain's wartime leader, Winston Churchill, in "The Gathering Storm."

Finney also tried his hand at directing and producing and played a vital role in sustaining British theater.

Finney is survived by his third wife, Pene, son Simon and two grandchildren. Funeral arrangements were not immediately known.

FILE- In this June 20, 2008, file photo Kristoff St. John accepts the award for outstanding supporting actor in a drama series for his work on "The Young and the Restless" at the 35th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles. John has died at age 52. Los Angeles police were called to John's home on Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019, and his body was turned over to the Los Angeles County coroner. The cause of death was not available. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

Officials say Los Angeles police were called to his home on Sunday and his body was turned over to the Los Angeles County coroner. The cause of death was not available.

St. John had played Neil Winters on the CBS soap opera since 1991, earning nine daytime Emmy nominations. He won 10 NAACP Image Awards.

St. John was twice married and divorced and was the father of a son and two daughters. His 24-year-old son, Julian, died in 2014.

On Jan. 21, St. John retweeted "Grieving the loss of a child is a process. It begins on the day your child passes, and ends the day the parent joins them."

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 1984 file photo, actress Kaye Ballard appears with her dog, Big Shirley during an interview in her New York apartment. Marguerite Gordon, a friend of Ballard says the actress of the TV series “The Mothers-in-Law,” died Monday, Jan. 21, 2019, at her home in Rancho Mirage, Calif. she was 93. A boisterous comedian and singer as well as an actress, Ballard appeared in Broadway musicals and nightclubs from New York to Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Suzanne Vlamis, File)

LOS ANGELES  — Kaye Ballard, the boisterous comedian and singer who appeared in Broadway musicals and nightclubs from New York to Las Vegas and starred with Eve Arden in the 1960s TV sitcom "The Mothers-In-Law," has died. She was 93.

Ballard died Monday night at her home in Rancho Mirage, California, after a fight with kidney cancer, her friend Marguerite Gordon said Tuesday.

"The Mothers-In-Law," in which Ballard starred with Arden (of the 1950s sitcom "Our Miss Brooks"), aired from 1967 to 1969. It marked a high point in a career that began when Ballard was 12 and lasted into the 21st century.

She was on hand last week when a documentary on her life and career premiered at the Palm Springs International Film Festival.

"She was so excited to be able to tell her story," said Dan Wingate, the film's director. "She was really anxious for young people, especially, who are going into the arts to understand the full breadth of a life in the arts, the ups and downs."

The audience's response was gratifying for her, "to hear that applause and feel that love," Wingate said, and she was thrilled when the documentary was singled out for festival honors.

"The Mothers-In-Law" was set in a Los Angeles suburb and featured its stars as women who become thorns in their married children's lives, with comedic results influenced by the screwball style of "I Love Lucy."

Desi Arnaz, who starred with wife Lucille Ball in that classic sitcom, produced and directed 24 episodes of the Ballard-Arden show. The "I Love Lucy" team of Bob Carroll Jr. and Madelyn Pugh Davis were the show's creators and lead writers.

Ballard made a mark in every form of show business except movies. She did appear as a secondary player in a few films, including 1958's "The Girl Most Likely" starring Jane Powell and in 1964's "A House Is Not a Home," but her high-octane personality may have been too potent for the big screen of that era and its more restrictive portrayals of women.

Movie stardom was her first dream, as it was for others of her generation, filmmaker Wingate said, and he wanted the documentary to be seen on the big screen to help fulfill that goal.

But even falling short of a big film career, "she was able to reach and endear herself to so many people," he said.

Ballard's first real break came when she was singing in a Detroit nightclub, The Bowery. Comedy bandleader Spike Jones dropped in one night and quickly drafted the exuberant young singer into his musical contingent. For two years she toured with Jones' troupe, singing, playing the flute and tuba and engaging in the band's antics. She also sang with the bands of Vaughn Monroe and Stan Kenton.

In 1945 she moved to New York and sought work in theater, appearing on Broadway in a small part in the revue "Three to Make Ready." She toured in summer stock and finally made a dent in New York as a madcap Helen of Troy in 1954's "The Golden Apple," drawing applause with her song "Lazy Afternoon." One critic called her performance "a wonder of insinuation."

She also won critical praise for her role as "The Incomparable Rosalie," the magician's assistant and mistress in 1961's "Carnival!," a musicalized version of the movie "Lili." She sang "Always, Always You" while stretched out in a box the jealous magician was piercing with swords.

Ballard began working on TV in the early 1950s, becoming an in-demand performer on network variety programs including "The Mel Torme Show" and those of Ed Sullivan and Perry Como. She also became a favorite of talk show hosts, making repeat appearances with Jack Paar, Merv Griffin and Johnny Carson.

Her nightclub act played in first-class venues including the Blue Angel in New York, Mr. Kelly's in Chicago, the Flamingo in Las Vegas and the hungry i in San Francisco.

She was born Catherine Gloria Ballota to Italian immigrant parents in Cleveland, Ohio, on Nov. 20, 1925, according to her 2006 memoir "How I Lost 10 Pounds in 53 Years." (She noted she had always said she was born in 1926.)

She changed her name to Kaye Ballard when she entered show business. On the advice of a numerologist she switched to Kay in midcareer.

"He said my luck would change if I dropped the 'e'," she told a reporter in 1983. "It did. It went steadily downward."

Determined to become an actress, she would not be discouraged by a high school teacher who rejected her for a drama class, concluding she "wasn't pretty enough," nor her parents, who didn't understand the business.

She sang at service clubs and appeared at a "Stage Door Canteen" in Cleveland. After graduating from high school she worked at a burlesque theater, not as a stripper but as straight woman in comedy sketches. She went on the road with her act of songs, comedy and impressions of famous stars and in Detroit made the fortuitous connection with Jones.

In the early 2000s, Ballard toured with other stars in a musical comedy "Nunsense" and joined the touring company of the Broadway hit "The Full Monty" as piano player for six men who stripped to make money with a musical show.

"I didn't want to," she told The Associated Press in 1999. "I could have, many times. But I just wanted a career too much. I was smart enough to know, if you get married and have children, that's it. Being Italian and raised as a Catholic, I took children seriously. Maybe I made a mistake. Who knows?"

"It's a stone's throw from Gerald Ford," she said of her presidential neighbor in a 1981 interview. "When he moved in, he upped my property value. It made me think of becoming a Republican."

"I'm not going to retire. I don't believe in retiring," she told the AP in 2001. "I do take more time off now to enjoy life and my three dogs and house. But if something wonderful comes up, I'm ready."

FILE - This Feb. 24, 1982 file photo shows actress Carol Channing at the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Channing, whose career spanned decades on Broadway and on television has died at age 97. Publicist B. Harlan Boll says Channing died of natural causes early Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in Rancho Mirage, Calif.(AP Photo/Doug Pizac, File)

NEW YORK — Carol Channing, the lanky, ebullient musical comedy star who delighted American audiences over almost 5,000 performances as the scheming Dolly Levi in "Hello, Dolly" on Broadway and beyond, has died. She was 97.

Publicist B. Harlan Boll said Channing died of natural causes at 12:31 a.m. Tuesday in Rancho Mirage, California. Boll says she had twice suffered strokes in the last year.

Besides "Hello, Dolly," Channing starred in other Broadway shows, but none with equal magnetism. She often appeared on television and in nightclubs, for a time partnering with George Burns in Las Vegas and a national tour.

Her outsized personality seemed too much for the screen, and she made only a few movies, notably "The First Traveling Saleslady" with Ginger Rogers and "Thoroughly Modern Millie" with Julie Andrews.

Over the years, Channing continued as Dolly in national tours, the last in 1996, when she was in her 70s. Tom Shales of The Washington Post called her "the ninth wonder of the world."

Channing was not the immediate choice to play Dolly, a matchmaker who receives her toughest challenge yet when a rich grump seeks a suitable wife. The show, which  features a rousing score by Jerry Herman that's bursting with joy and tunes like "Put On Your Sunday Clothes," ''Before the Parade Passes By" and "It Only Takes a Moment," is a musical version of Thornton Wilder's play "The Matchmaker."

Theater producer David Merrick told her: "I don't want that silly grin with all those teeth that go back to your ears." Even though director Gower Champion had worked on her first Broadway hit, "Lend an Ear," he had doubts about Channing's casting.

She wowed them in an audition and was hired on the spot. At opening night on Jan. 16, 1964, when Channing appeared at the top of the stairs in a red gown with feathers in her hair and walked down the red carpet to the Harmonia Gardens restaurant, the casehardened New York audience went crazy. The critics followed suit. "Hello, Dolly" collected 10 Tony Awards, including one for Channing as best actress in a musical.

She was born Jan. 31, 1921, in Seattle, where her father, George Channing, was a newspaper editor. When his only child was 3 months old, he moved to San Francisco and worked as a writer for the Christian Science Monitor and as a lecturer. He later became editor-in-chief of Christian Science publications.

At the age of 7, Channing decided she wanted to become an entertainer. She credited her father with encouraging her: "He told me you can dedicate your life at 7 or 97. And the people who do that are happier people."

While majoring in drama and dance at Bennington College in Vermont, she was sent off to get experience in her chosen field. She found a job in a New York revue. The show lasted only two weeks, but a New Yorker magazine critic commented, "You will hear more about a satiric chanteuse named Carol Channing." She said later: "That was it. I said goodbye to trigonometry, zoology and English literature."

For several years she worked as an understudy, bit player and nightclub impressionist, taking jobs as a model, receptionist and sales clerk during lean times. Landing in Los Angeles, she auditioned for Marge Champion, wife and dance partner of Gower Champion who was putting together a revue, "Lend an Ear." Marge Champion recalled: "She certainly was awkward and odd-looking, but her warmth and wholesomeness came through."

Channing was the hit of "Lend an Ear" in a small Hollywood theater, and she captivated audiences and critics when the show moved to New York. As the innocent gold digger in the musical "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," her stardom was assured. One reviewer reported she "hurls across the footlights in broad strokes of pantomime and bold, certain, exquisitely comical gestures." The show's hit song, "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend," became her signature number.

Over and over again she returned to the surefire "Hello, Dolly," which earned her $5 million on one tour. She considered Dolly Levi "a role as deep as Lady Macbeth," but added that "the essence of her character was her unquenchable thirst for life." That description fit Carol Channing, who attributed her sunny optimism to her lifelong faith in Christian Science.

Others who have played the role include Pearl Bailey, Phillis Diller, Betty Grable, Ethel Merman, Martha Raye, Ginger Rogers and Barbra Streisand, who played Dolly in a 1969 film version directed by Gene Kelly. Bette Midler won a Tony Award in the role in 2017.

Channing had two early marriages that ended in divorce — to novelist Theodore Naidish and pro footballer Alexander Carson, father of her only child, Channing. Her son became a successful political cartoonist.

In 1956 she married a television producer, Charles Lowe, who seemed like the perfect mate for a major star. He adopted Channing's son and supervised every aspect of her business affairs and appearances. He reportedly viewed every one of her performances from out front, leading the applause.

After 41 years of marriage, she sued for divorce in 1998, alleging that he misappropriated her funds and humiliated her in public. She remarked that they only had sex twice in four decades.

"The only thing about control freak victims is that they don't know who they are," she told The Washington Post. "It's taken me 77 years to figure that out. I was miserable. I was unhappy. And I didn't realize it wasn't my fault. But I'm going to survive. I'm going to live. I'm free."

Lowe died after a stroke in 1999. Channing moved to Rancho Mirage near Palm Springs, California, in 2000 to write her memoirs. She called the book "Just Lucky, I Guess."

Channing remarried in 2003 to Harry Kullijian, her childhood sweetheart from 70 years before. He died in 2011.

In her book, Channing recounted an early story from her childhood that showed a budding audience-pleasing performer. She wrote that she came home from kindergarten and noted that all the little girls hit the little boys.

BAR HARBOR, Maine (AP) — Verna Bloom, the actress who portrayed the wife of the dean in the movie "Animal House," has died. She was 80.

Family spokesman Mike Kaplan tells The Hollywood Reporter that Bloom died Wednesday in Bar Harbor, Maine, of complications from dementia.

In the 1978 John Landis film, Bloom played Marion Wormer, who flirted with and had a drunken romp with fraternity president "Otter" Stratton.

She was Clint Eastwood's lover in "High Plains Drifter" and was Mary in "The Last Temptation of Christ."

She is survived by her husband, former film critic and two-time Oscar-nominated screenwriter Jack Cocks, and a son.

FILE-This Oct. 25, 1995 file photo shows Toni Tennille, left, and Daryl Dragon, the singing duo The Captain and Tennille, posing during an interview in at their home in Washoe Valley, south of Reno, Nev. Dragon died early Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019 in at a hospice in Prescott, Ariz. Spokesman Harlan Boll said he was 76 and died of renal failure. His former wife and musical partner, Toni Tennille, was by his side. (AP Photo/David B. Parker, File)

Daryl Dragon, the cap-wearing "Captain" of Captain & Tennille who teamed with then-wife Toni Tennille on such easy listening hits as "Love Will Keep Us Together" and "Muskrat Love," died Wednesday. He was 76. Dragon died of renal failure at a hospice in Prescott, Arizona, according to spokesman Harlan Boll. Tennille was by his side. "He was a brilliant musician with many friends who loved him greatly. I was at my most creative in my life, when I was with him," Tennille said in a statement. Dragon and Tennille divorced in 2014 after nearly 40 years of marriage, but they remained close and Tennille had moved back to Arizona to help care for him. Dragon and Tennille met in the early 1970s and soon began performing together, with the ever-smiling Tennille singing and the dourer Dragon on keyboards. He would later serve as Captain & Tennille's producer. Their breakthrough came in 1975 when they covered the bouncy Neil Sedaka-Howard Greenfield song "Love Will Keep Us Together." Sedaka and Greenfield, a top hit-making team in the late 1950s and early 1960s, were nearing the end of their partnership and had written "Love Will Keep Us Together" as an ode to their longtime bond. Sedaka himself recorded the song, released it as a single in France, and included it on his 1974 album "Sedaka's Back." Captain & Tennille's version, slightly faster and funkier than the original, wasn't Dragon's first choice as a single. He had favored a cover of Beach Boy Bruce Johnston's "I Write the Songs," which in 1976 became a signature hit for Barry Manilow. But "Love Will Keep Us Together" topped the charts in the summer of 1975. It won a Grammy for record of the year and not only made Captain & Tennille stars, but helped further revive Sedaka's career. In October 1975, his single "Bad Blood" hit No. 1. Sedaka tweeted Wednesday that Dragon was "a great musician, keyboard player and friend for over 40 years. He took 'Love Will Keep Us Together,' made it his own with the magic of his playing and her incredible voice." Meanwhile, Captain & Tennille — known early on as The Captain & Tennille — followed with a mix of covers such as "Muskrat Love" and "Shop Around" and original songs, including Tennille's ballad "Do That to Me One More Time," which hit No. 1 in 1980. They also briefly starred in their own television variety show before their careers faded in the 1980s. Over the past 30 years, they continued to perform and work together on occasion, with more recent albums including "The Secret of Christmas." A Los Angeles native, Dragon was the son of Oscar-winning composer Carmen Dragon and singer Eloise Dragon and was himself a classically trained musician. Before he was with Tennille, he played keyboards for the Beach Boys and was dubbed "The Captain" by singer Mike Love, who noted Dragon's fondness for sea captain's caps. Tennille briefly worked with the Beach Boys as a backup singer. "So sad to hear about Daryl Dragon," the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson tweeted Wednesday. "Daryl was a great guy and a hell of a musician and keyboard player. I feel very bad about this." In 2016, Tennille published "Toni Tennille: A Memoir," in which she alleged their marriage was far removed from their cheerful hits. They wed in 1975, but Tennille recalled that their marriage was announced in advance — and to their surprise — by the record company. The couple, which had been living together, made it official in November of that year. Tennille would allege that the couple suffered from lack of intimacy and blamed it on what she described as Dragon's "very, very difficult family and "famous but overbearing father." "I kept trying and trying and thinking I could bring this man who has so much to give into the light," she told NBC's "Today" show in 2016. "I wanted him to experience the joy that I had with my very loving family." Dragon is survived by his older brother, Doug Dragon, and two nieces, Kelly Arbout and Renee Henn.

In this July 31, 1988 photo provided by the WWE, "Mean" Gene Okerlund addresses the crowd before a pro wrestling event in Milwaukee. Okerlund, who interviewed pro wrestling superstars "Macho Man" Randy Savage, The Ultimate Warrior and Hulk Hogan, has died. He was 76. WWE announced Okerlund's death on its website Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. (WWE via AP)

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Eugene "Mean Gene" Okerlund, whose deadpan interviews of pro wrestling superstars like "Macho Man" Randy Savage, The Ultimate Warrior and Hulk Hogan made him a ringside fixture in his own right, has died. He was 76. World Wrestling Entertainment announced Okerlund's death on its website Wednesday. Okerlund's son, Tor Okerlund, told The Associated Press that his father died early Wednesday at a hospital in Sarasota, Florida, near his home in Osprey, Florida, with his wife, Jeanne, by his side. Tor Okerlund said his father, who had undergone three kidney transplants, fell a few weeks ago "and it just kind of went from bad to worse." Okerlund started as an interviewer in the Minneapolis-based American Wrestling Association. He moved to WWE — then the World Wrestling Federation — in 1984 and hosted several shows, including "All-American Wrestling," ''Tuesday Night Titans" and "Prime Time Wrestling." Besides being the company's lead locker room interviewer, he also provided ringside commentary. Former wrestler and ex-Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura, who wrestled as "The Body," dubbed Okerlund "Mean Gene." Ventura told the Minneapolis Star Tribune on Wednesday that in an interview he "laughingly called him 'the Mean Gene Hot Air Machine,' and the 'Mean Gene' stuck." Ventura called Okerlund "the best at what he did, the best straight man interviewer in wrestling history." "You only had to tell him once" how to pitch and sell a wrestling story, Ventura told the AP about Okerlund's knack for salesmanship. "He's like a carnival barker. ... He was the best salesman. And he never did retakes. ... Ninety percent of the time if there was a screw-up on an interview, it was not because of Gene. That's how good he was." A native of Sisseton, South Dakota, Okerlund was known for his natty attire and mustache. He was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2006. Okerlund also could sing and performed the national anthem at the first WrestleMania in 1985. He sang "Tutti Frutti" later that year on the WWF's "The Wrestling Album." "He really was the ultimate, the consummate entertainer," his son said. In a 2015 interview with the Star Tribune, Okerlund credited the late pro wrestling pioneer Verne Gagne for his start. Okerlund worked in sales at the television station where Gagne's AWA was based and had experience in radio. Gagne approached Okerlund in the hallway when the regular interviewer could not make a taping in the early 1970s, Okerlund recalled. "I said, 'Verne, I know zero about wrestling.' He said, 'Do you have a suit and tie? That's all you need.' There were a few bucks involved, so I dived in," Okerlund said. Funeral arrangements are pending.

FILE - In this June 27, 2018 file photo, Bob Einstein arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of "Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind" at the TCL Chinese Theatre. Albert Brooks, the younger brother of Einstein says the comedy veteran known for "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour" and "Curb Your Enthusiasm" has died. He was 76. Brooks, posted a tweet Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019, in which he said Einstein "will be missed forever." (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Bob Einstein, the veteran comedy writer and performer known for "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour," ''Curb Your Enthusiasm" and his spoof daredevil character Super Dave Osborne, has died, according to his brother, filmmaker Albert Brooks. Einstein was 76. Einstein will be "missed forever," Brooks said in a post Wednesday on his verified Twitter account. "R.I.P. My dear brother Bob Einstein. A great brother, father and husband. A brilliantly funny man," tweeted Brooks, 71. Details of Einstein's death were not immediately available. Representatives for him and Brooks did not immediately respond to calls or emails. Einstein was scheduled to be part of the 10th season of "Curb Your Enthusiasm," but his health barred him from filming, HBO said. On the comedy, Einstein played annoying pal Marty Funkhouser to Larry David's equally difficult character. In a statement, David said he'd never seen an actor enjoy a role more than Einstein did playing Marty. "It was an amazing, unforgettable experience knowing and working with him. There was no one like him, as he told us again and again," David said Wednesday. "We're all in a state of shock." Einstein created and played Super Dave, a stuntman who was far more ambitious than he was agile and looked the part in an eye-catching white jumpsuit. Super Dave appeared on comedy-variety specials and series, most recently "Super Dave's Spike Tacular" in 2009. "This character allows me to do anything I want, comedically, and get away with it," the comedian told The Associated Press in 1995, when he was starring in the series "Super Dave's Las Vegas Spectacular" series. Einstein recounted Super Dave's origins on a 1970s variety show. "I came up with the idea of a daredevil who's going to go upside down, in a metal car, at 90 mph, and it's never been done before," Einstein said then. "I get into this metal car, I'm strapped in. You pull back, and it's a roller coaster at Magic Mountain, with kids and nuns and everything else! "I pass out while everybody else is having a wonderful time," he said. Over time, Super Dave even made it into commercials for clothes and athletic shoes. Einstein said he never tired of his alter ego. Einstein was born in 1942 in Los Angeles to actress Thelma Leeds and comedian and actor Harry Einstein, also known as Harry Parke. He gained radio fame as the character Nick Parkyakarkus and later played him on the big screen. Besides Albert Brooks (his stage name), Bob Einstein's siblings include Clifford Einstein. Bob Einstein won an Emmy for writing on the 1960s series "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour," on which he also played opposite Tom and Dick Smothers, and a second Emmy in 1976 for Dick Van Dyke's "Van Dyke and Company" variety series. Comedian David Steinberg recalled on Twitter that he and Einstein started out together on the Smothers' show. "What a mind! What a great friend. Brilliantly funny always," Steinberg posted.

Moline's Kaeden Dreifurst looks down the field as he runs away from a tackler during the first quarter of their game at Moline last Friday. 

Five new light standards on the south side of 12th Street between Brady and Main streets are adding an extra feeling of security to the Hilltop Campus Village.

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Annette Cahill and defense attorney Clemens Erdahl discuss the trial Tuesday during closing arguments. The second murder trial of Cahill began last Monday with jury selection.

Danielle Alvarez, I-74 project manager for the Iowa Department of Transportation, left, talks with Quad-City Times columnist Barb Ickes about the new I-74 bridge project Tuesday.

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