This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules. Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Zak the Baker’s popular multigrain and country wheat loaves are crispy on the outside and chewy on the inside. Everything in the bakery is certified kosher.(Photo: Platonic Studios) Bread has suffered a bit over the past few decades, derided for being full of carbohydrates and no nutrition in an age of Atkins and low-carb diets. Recently though, Americans have come to realize that carbs are not all that terrible. And, bakers across the country are using whole, heirloom grains and long fermenting wild yeasts to create healthier, nutritious loaves. Some even have their own stone mills in order to provide the freshest grains possible. One of the south’s biggest proponents of heirloom grains, David Bauer makes some of the best bread you’ll ever taste at Farm & Sparrow Bakery in Candler, N.C. “Heirloom grains are important to me because they have a genetic wildness that gives them the potential for greater expression of place in their flavor and qualities,” says Bauer. “They are not inherently better, but they are more dynamic and have a great ...