Chris Geelhart, lead meteorologist at the National Weather Service at Lincoln, stands by the weather balloon the organization launches twice daily. Chris Geelhart, lead meteorologist at the National Weather Service at Lincoln, stands by the weather balloon the organization launches twice daily. My interest in weather extends way back into my childhood. Around the time I was in kindergarten, I was greatly afraid of storms. My mom suggested I get a library book on weather, and if I learned why storms occurred, I would be less afraid. My interest has never wavered since then. I started as a meteorological technician, so my path to being a meteorologist was a little different than usual. I completed my education as a combination of traditional college courses, as well as correspondence and online courses. A typical meteorologist in the National Weather Service usually has at least a Bachelor’s degree in meteorology or atmospheric science, and many have also completed graduate studies. Once a meteorologist joins the NWS, he or she will also receive extensive training on interpretation and use of Doppler radar. We have also recently received training on the latest generation of ...